NAILBA Perspectives Perspectives Fall 2018 - Page 11

“There is a delicate balance to strike in using technology to improve and scale your business while still maintaining an emphasis on personal relationships. With all of its benefits, technology is far from eliminating the need for personal interaction in this industry, if that’s possible at all.” KATIE ELLIOTT Katie Elliott is the Client Success Manager for OneHQ, a combined CRM and AMS platform for life, annuity, and senior brokerages. Katie and her team are passion- ate about being a true partner to their clients, guiding them in utiliz- ing HQ’s capabilities to meet each group’s unique business needs. For more information on how the OneHQ team can help you accel- erate your business, please visit www.onehq.com. brain will actually interpret and weigh new information differently in agreement with your existing be- liefs 2 . This phenomenon, known as confirmation bias, leads people to focus more heavily on information that confirms their initial impression of you and quickly dismiss any infor- mation that opposes it. If a potential client has seen and was impressed by your ad, they will already have a pos- itive impression of you, and they will pay more attention to your compa- ny’s advantages than your shortcom- ings once you do get in contact. 3. Admit it when you’ve made a mistake or when you don’t know. None of us like to admit being wrong, but unfortunately it happens to ev- eryone occasionally. When you have limited interactions with your cli- ents, it’s important to make every touchpoint count, and it can be tempting to make excuses and de- fer blame when something has gone wrong. However, assuming you’ve completed suggestions 1 and 2 cor- rectly, it may actually benefit you to be honest about your mistakes! In a 1966 study, psychologist El- liot Aronson found that people who are already viewed as competent were rated as even more likeable after committing a small blunder 3 . The idea here is that a stranger who seems intelligent and put-together becomes more relatable and “real” after making a mistake. Acknowledg- ing and handling a small error well in front of your clients has the potential to make you more personable, while proving that you’re honest and trust- worthy. (Keep in mind that this does require first establishing a positive image in the client’s mind!) 4. Remember: Content is King. You may be familiar with the market- ing adage “content is king,” meaning that the information you’re commu- nicating should always be the focal point of your marketing strategy. This holds true for recruiting new clients and catering to your current agents – oftentimes, providing quality service simply means providing the informa- tion your clients need. Prospective clients want to know the services your brokerage provides, which can easily be displayed on a website. Current clients want to stay updated on their business and commissions, which can be emailed out automat- ically from your AMS. Even without the element of personal interaction, you can build a personal bond with your agents by showing them that you know what information is im- portant to them. If you provide your agents with a personal snapshot of their business every week, or email updates as their cases are processed, even if they’re clearly templated dis- cussions, your agents will appreciate your organization and understanding of their needs. 5. Know technology’s place in your business. There is a delicate balance to strike in using technology to improve and scale your business while still main- taining an emphasis on personal re- lationships. With all of its benefits, technology is far from eliminating the need for personal interaction in this industry, if that’s possible at all. With hundreds of us preparing to gather at NAILBA 37, no one can argue that there’s no longer a place for in-person relationship building. However, making the most of the technology available and keeping these tips in mind, you can eliminate busywork to make more time for the most meaningful interactions. FOOTNOTES 1 The Economist. (2009, Oct. 14). “The halo effect”. https://www.economist.com/news/2009/10/14/the-halo-effect 2 Cassad, Bettina J. (2016, Aug. 1). “Confirmation bias”. https://www.britannica.com/science/confirmation-bias 3  ernstein, Rebecca. (2017, June 26). “Interesting Psychological Phenomena: The Pratfall Effect”. https://online.brescia.edu/psychology-news/pratfall- B effect/ www.nailba.org 11