Trends Winter 2015 - Page 4

A VARIETY OF PROJECTS
Projects since Ayres started at Highway G have included reviewing the landfill ’ s bioreactor operation , performing a structural analysis of the bioreactor , preparing a special waste acceptance plan to allow the collection of additional nonhazardous materials , and negotiating with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to reduce groundwater monitoring wells , which has significantly cut the landfill ’ s environmental monitoring costs .
“ We were able to financially develop a plan to keep the landfill open for present needs and for future development ,” Rayala said .
OVERCOMING OBSTACLES – TOGETHER
The Highway G Landfill suffered a setback in late September when its waste tipping floor / main office building sustained major damage in a fire . A 6 p . m . security alarm call alerted landfill officials to a problem at the building . Landfill Manager Mark Busha returned to the landfill after his normal workday and knew big trouble was brewing long before he got there .
“ I could see when I got within a mile – I could see the smoke ,” he said . “ I was going to run in and get the computers , but it was too smoky .”
BUILDING A RELATIONSHIP
The courtship of the Highway G Landfill was a long process . Steve Bischoff , former supervisor of environmental services at Ayres , remembers discussing the possibility of working at the landfill for six to eight years before LVG switched to Ayres . He retired at the end of 2012 , shortly after helping to land the new client .
“ We knew that they were looking to expand ,” Bischoff said . “ With that in mind , it would be a long-term client . I think it ’ s been more than we envisioned . The timing just happened to be really good for us and for them too .”
With Bischoff near retirement , lead engineering duties at the landfill were given to Erik Lietz , a civil and solid waste engineer at Ayres since 2004 . Lietz visits the landfill about every six weeks , more frequently if his presence is needed . Lietz is heavily involved with four other landfills in Wisconsin , but this one has qualities that make his work there special . “ It is a unique operation , especially with their bioreactor ,” Lietz said . “ They are a good bunch of people , and they ask a lot of operations questions . I feel I can give them my support with my experience and optimize their operations .”
Landfill staff has had to rely on a trailer home as its main office space since the fire , which is suspected to have started in a piece of equipment parked in the building . With the fire destroying phones and computers and knocking out all power to the property in the midst of an expansion project , Ayres Associates engineer Erik Lietz took on extra duties coordinating with staff at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources ( WDNR ).
Landfill manager Busha , for one , appreciates the help he gets from Lietz . “ We work a lot with Erik . I have nothing but good things to say about him ,” Busha said . “ He has a good rapport with people in the state ( Department of Natural Resources ). He has a good reputation with them , which moves projects along faster and reduces our consulting costs .”
Relationships and good timing have led to a strong clientconsultant bond that appears to have a bright future . The expansion will give the landfill capacity to keep operating for approximately 13 years , and Ayres plans to be there every step of the way .
“ Erik did a really nice job being back and forth with the WDNR for me ,” Busha said . “ It took a while to get our communications back up and running .”
4│TRENDS
A VARIETY OF PROJECTS OVERCOMING OBSTACLES – TOGETHER Projects since Ayres started at Highway G have included reviewing the landfill’s bioreactor operation, performing a structural analysis of the bioreactor, preparing a special waste acceptance plan to allow the collection of additional nonhazardous materials, and negotiating with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to reduce groundwater monitoring wells, which has significantly cut the landfill’s environmental monitoring costs. The Highway G Landfill suffered a setback in late September when its waste tipping floor/main office building sustained major damage in a fire. A 6 p.m. security alarm call alerted landfill officials to a problem at the building. Landfill Manager Mark Busha returned to the landfill after his normal workday and knew big trouble was brewing long before he got there. “We were able to financially develop a plan to keep the landfill open for present needs and for future development,” Rayala said. “I could see when I got within a mile – I could see the smoke,” he said. “I was going to run in and get the computers, but it was too smoky.” BUILDING A RELATIONSHIP The courtship of the Highway G Landfill was a long process. Steve Bischoff, former supervisor of environmental services at Ayres, remembers discussing the possibility of working at the landfill for six to eight years before LVG switched to Ayres. He retired at the end of 2012, shortly after helping to land the new client. “We knew that they were looking to expand,” Bischoff said. “With that in mind, it would be a long-term client. I think ӊéɔѡݔ٥ͥQѥ)Ѽɕ䁝ȁ́ȁѡѽt)]Ѡ ͍ȁɕѥɕаɥѥ)ЁѡݕɔٕѼɥ1谁٥ͽ)݅єȁЁɕ́ͥи1٥ͥ́ѡ)Ёٕͥݕ̰ɔɕՕѱ䁥́ɕ͕)1聥́٥䁥ٽٕݥѠȁѡȁ)]͍ͥЁѡ́́Յѥ́ѡЁ)ݽɬѡɔq%Ё́չՔɅѥ)ݥѠѡȁɕѽȳt1ͅqQ䁅ɔչ)ѡ䁅ͬЁɅѥ́Օѥ̸$)$ٔѡЁݥѠ䁕ɥ)ѥ锁ѡȁɅѥ̻t()1х́Ѽɕ䁽Ʌȁ́)ͥѡɔݡ́ѕ)ѼٔхѕեЁɭ)ѡե]Ѡѡɔɽ她́)ѕ́ЁݕȁѼѡɽ)ѡЁͥɽаɕ́ͽѕ)ȁɥ1ѽɄѥ́ɑѥ)ݥѠхЁѡ]͍ͥѵЁ9Ʌ)Iͽɍ̀]9H()1ȁ ͡ȁɕѕ́ѡ)́ɽ1踃q]ݽɬЁݥѠɥ$ٔѡ)Ёѡ́Ѽͅ䁅Ёt ͡ͅq!)ɅЁݥѠѡхєѵ)9ɅIͽɍ̤!́ɕхѥݥѠ)ѡݡٕ́ɽ́ѕȁɕՍ́)ձѥ̻t)Iѥ́͡ѥٔѼɽэձхЁѡЁ́ѼٔɥЁɔQ)ͥݥٔѡѼɅѥ)ȁɽ᥵ѕ́啅̰ɕ́́Ѽѡɔ)ٕѕѡ݅(ӊR QI9L(+qɥɕ䁹ѠݥѠѡ)]9Hȁt ͡ͅq%ЁѽݡѼЁ)չѥ́չt((0