Health & Wellness Magazine Live + Thrive Magazine - Summer 2018 - Page 12

QUIET POWER

Quiet Power :

INTROVERTS VS . EXTROVERTS

I ’ VE COME to realize not only how important it is to follow my instincts and interests , but also to express my feelings and explain my actions to others . Here ’ s an example that might be familiar to you : Say you ’ re walking through the hallway , from one class to another , deep in thought or possibly overwhelmed by the noise and crowds . You pass a friend or classmate and glance at her briefly , but you ’ re so preoccupied that you don ’ t manage to stop to say hi and chitchat . You haven ’ t meant to be rude or hurtful , but your friend thinks you ’ re angry about something .
Be on the lookout for moments of misunderstanding such as this one , and do your best to explain what you were thinking and feeling . An extroverted friend — and maybe even an introverted one — likely won ’ t guess that you were distracted by your thoughts or by too much sensory stimulation , and your explanation will make all the difference .
Not everyone will understand your nature , though , even if you try to explain it . When Robby , a teenager from New Hampshire , first learned about introversion , he felt a great sense of relief . He had a tendency to turn quiet in large groups , and although he ’ d always felt comfortable talking and joking with his closest friends , he had a limit . “ After a couple of hours I ’ m like , ‘ Whoa , I can ’ t do this .’ It ’ s draining . There ’ s a wall that goes up and I don ’ t want to talk to anyone . It ’ s not physical exhaustion . It ’ s mental exhaustion .”
Robby tried to explain the differences between introverts and extroverts to an outgoing friend , but she couldn ’ t understand his perspective . She thrived in loud , busy places and didn ’ t see why he needed to be alone so often . Another friend of his , Drew , grasped the idea immediately . Drew was more of an ambivert . He wasn ’ t as outgoing as his younger sister , but he wasn ’ t as reserved as his parents , either . The more he talked with Robby about what it was like to be introverted , the more he wanted people to understand both sides of his own personality .
As an amateur filmmaker , Drew had been experimenting with a new animation style , and after researching the
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QUIET POWER Quiet Power: INTROVERTS VS. EXTROVERTS I’VE COME to realize not only how important it is to follow my instincts and interests, but also to express my feelings and explain my actions to others. Here’s an example that might be familiar to you: Say you’re walking through the hallway, from one class to another, deep in thought or possibly overwhelmed by the noise and crowds. You pass a friend or classmate and glance at her briefly, but you’re so preoccupied that you don’t manage to stop to say hi and chitchat. You haven’t meant to be rude or hurtful, but your friend thinks you’re angry about something. Be on the lookout for moments of misunderstanding such as this one, and do your best to explain what you were thinking and feeling. An extroverted friend — and maybe even an introverted one — likely won’t guess that you were distracted by your thoughts or by too much sensory stimulation, and your explanation will make all the difference. Not everyone will understand your nature, though, even if you try to explain it. When Robby, a teenager from New Hampshire, first learned about introversion, he felt a great sense of relief. He had a tendency to turn quiet in large groups, and although he’d always felt comfortable talking and joking ݥѠ͕́Ёɥ̰иqѕȁ)́'ea]$eЁѡ̻d%ӊéɅ)Qɗé݅ѡЁ́$eЁ݅ЁѼхѼ)役%ӊéЁͥᡅѥ%ӊéхᡅѥt)IɥѼѡɕ́ݕɽٕ́)ɽٕ́ѼѝɥЁ͡ձeЁչх)́ѥٔMѡɥٕՐ́e)͕ݡ䁡Ѽͼѕѡȁɥ)̰ɕܰɅѡѕ丁ɕ܁݅́ɔ)ٕи!݅ͻeЁ́ѝ́́չȁͥѕȰ)Ё݅ͻeЁ́ɕ͕ٕ́́ɕ̰ѡȸQɔ)хݥѠI䁅ЁݡЁЁ݅́Ѽɽٕѕ)ѡɔ݅ѕѼչхѠͥ́)ݸͽ)́ѕȁȰɕ܁ɥѥ)ݥѠ܁ѥ屔ѕȁɕ͕ɍѡ(