Consumer Confidence Report Water Quality Report-2017-ENG - Page 8

For more information: Water Quality:................................................ 817-575-8984 Laboratory services, water quality questions or water quality problems. If you have questions concerning this brochure, ask for the laboratory. Customer Care:...............................................817-275-5931 Open new or transfer account, billing inquiries, water conserva- tion, water and sewer rates. Emergency Water, and Sewer Services (24 hours):...........................817-459-5900 Service interruptions, water leaks, sewer problems Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ):..............................................512-239-1000 To participate in decisions concerning water: Attend the Arlington City Council meetings held in City Hall, 101 West Abram Street. Meeting schedule is posted online at www.arlingtontx.gov/citycouncil/meeting-schedule/ To view City Council Agenda or to watch a City Council meeting webcast, please visit www.arlingtontx.gov/citycouncil/agendas/ In accordance with Section 13.045 of the Texas Water Code, the City hereby provides notice that customer revenue derived from the sale of water to wholesale customers for resale was expended for various economic development and Capital Budget projects. Visit our website at: www.ArlingtonTX.gov/water/CCR Water Utilities staff participated in more than 40 school, library, and community presentations in 2017. Interested in taking a tour of one of our facilities or having a speaker visit your classroom? Contact Traci Peterson, Arlington Water Utilities communications coordinator, at traci.peterson@arlingtontx.gov. Should I be worried about lead in my drinking water? The City of Arlington tests for lead every three years at 50 sites across the city, as required by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Because of its history of testing results registering well below established limits, Arlington’s lead testing frequency was decreased from every six months to a three year schedule by the TCEQ. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Arlington Water Utilities is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials use in plumbing components. Older homes (built before 1930) are more likely to have plumbing fixtures containing lead. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. What should I do if I see small black particles in my water? Usually, the culprit is a faucet or water heater in need of maintenance. If the problem is in just one faucet, it’s likely that the black, rubber o-ring at the tip of the faucet needs replacing because it is breaking apart. Problems in the water heater can come from deteriorating supply hoses or lime buildup. Want to learn more about Arlington’s water? Visit us at www.arlingtontx.gov/water or follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/arlingtonwater) or Twitter (@arlingtonwater). You can also find useful information about efficient water use at www.SaveArlingtonWater.com. 8