Trunkline Magazine (Louisville Zoo) Trunkline Magazine: June 2017 - Page 12

Art & Nature

By Marcelle Gianelloni
Have you ever noticed objects like masks , statues , and other cultural reminders when visiting the Zoo ’ s exhibits ? Most of us first look for the animal we ’ ve come to see — but hopefully , you ’ ve taken the time to look around and see some of the “ props ” that have been included to immerse you not only into the animal ’ s habitat but also into a part of the world far away .
One of my mentors over the years , Jon Coe , taught me a great deal about the importance of “ cultural resonance .” Jon Coe has been a planning and design expert for over thirty years . His firm , CLR design , Inc . was the firm that helped us design the award-winning Islands and Gorilla Forest exhibits . There are many factors that go into designing zoo exhibits : animal welfare and care , safety , visitor viewing and interpretative messaging . It ’ s also important to create a story line , signage , and cultural connections . We want to connect you , our guests , to the issues of today ’ s conservation efforts and help you be part of the solution . Conservation measures , many of them community based , are key to the future of ecosystems around the world and people must play a part in the story . It all goes back to the Zoo ’ s mission “ to better the bond between people and our planet .”
Above : I . Wayan Puja ,
( center ) creator of many sculpture pieces found outside temples in Bali , was teaching his son this generational trade when they met Marcelle .
At Right : Marcelle with sculpture at the Zoo
In the “ Islands ,” guests are transported to many exotic places around the world . Did you notice the Indonesian theme ? The outdoor exhibits , Kebyar House and Banjar House , look like a meeting place or a home in Bali . Look around and observe the patterns , masks , wooden windows and sculpture pieces . But , where did the artifacts come from ?
Two years before the opening of Islands in 1994 , my husband and I were heading to Indonesia . Jon Coe asked me if I would be willing to pick up a few artifacts for the exhibit while I was there . I agreed , not knowing that our trip would now include meeting artists in Yoyakarta ( Java ) and Bali . On your next visit to the Islands , look up in the Banyar and Kebyar Houses and you will see some created by artists in Bali . The wooden windows and batik
patterns also came from Indonesia . The batik materials were laminated and placed in the Kebyar House to create spaces for the interpretive signage . Indonesia is far away but through these pieces of art , we were able to bring the flavors of Indonesia to you .
Glacier Run was another wonderful challenge . I was fortunate to be able to visit Churchill , Canada , known as the “ Polar Bear Capital of the World ” with a few of our teens as part of a Polar Bear International education program . While there , I was able to do some research about local Inuit art . I really wanted
12 • Louisville Zoo Trunkline • Summer 2017
Art & Nature By Marcelle Gianelloni Have you ever noticed objects like masks, statues, and other cultural reminders when visiting the Zoo’s exhibits? Most of us fi rst look for the animal we’ve come to see — but hopefully, you’ve taken the time to look around and see some of the “props” that have been in- cluded to immerse you not only into the animal’s habitat but also into a part of the world far away. One of my mentors over the years, Jon Coe, taught me a great deal about the importance of “cul- tural resonance.” Jon Coe has been a planning and design expert for over thirty years. His fi rm, CLR de- sign, Inc. was the fi rm that helped us design the award-winning Islands and Gorilla Forest exhibits. There are many factors that go into design- ing zoo exhibits: animal welfare and care, safety, visitor viewing and interpretative messaging. It’s also important to create a story line, sig- nage, and cultural connections. We want to connect you, our guests, to the issues of today’s conservation efforts and help you be part of the solution. Conservation measures, many of them community based, are key to the future of ecosystems around the world and people must play a part in the story. It all goes back to the Zoo’s mission “to better the bond between people and our planet.” Above: I. Wayan Puja, (center) creator of many sculpture pieces found outside temples in Bali, was teaching his son this generational trade when they met Marcelle. At Right: Marcelle with sculpture at the Zoo In the “Islands,” guests are transported to many exotic places around the world. Did you notice the Indonesian theme? The outdoor exhibits, Kebyar House and Banjar House, look like a meeting place or a home in Bali. Look around and observe the patterns, masks, wooden windows and sculpture pieces. But, where did the artifacts come from? Two years before the opening of Islands in 1994, my husband and I were heading to Indonesia. Jon Coe asked me if I would be willing to pick up a few a ѥ́ȁѡ)Ёݡ$݅́ѡɔ$ɕ)ݥѡЁȁɥݽձ)Ցѥѥ́e六ф()ل =ȁЁ٥ͥЁѼ)ѡ%ͱ̰ѡ )-ȁ!͕́ԁݥ)͕ͽɕѕ䁅ѥ́ )Qݽݥ́ѥ(ȃ1ե٥iQչMյȀ)ѕɹ́ͼɽ%ͥ)Qѥѕɥ́ݕɔѕ)ѡ-ȁ!͔Ѽ)ɕє́ȁѡѕɕѥٔ)ͥ%ͥ́ȁ݅䁉)ѡɽ՝ѡ͔́аݔ)ݕɔѼɥѡٽ́)%ͥѼԸ)ȁIո݅́ѡȁݽȴ)հ$݅́չєѼ)Ѽ٥ͥЁ ɍ )ݸ́ѡqAȁ ȁ х)ѡ]ɱtݥѠ܁ȁѕ)́ЁAȁ ȁ%ѕɹѥ)ՍѥɽɅ]ѡɔ)$݅́Ѽͽɕ͕ɍ)Ё%եЁи$ɕ݅ѕ