Trends Winter 2017 - Page 15

CONVENTIONAL SURVEY STILL CHOICE METHOD FOR MANY PROJECTS

With high-definition ( HD ) laser scanning becoming more common as a surveying tool for spatial data collection , why would anyone still opt for conventional survey on a project ? Experts say it all depends on individual goals and needs . involved surveying a high-traffic interchange in Milwaukee , Wisconsin . Using HD scanning was the more feasible choice because it was far safer and faster than the conventional survey method . “ It ’ s a tool that we need sometimes , but we don ’ t use it every day .”

“ HD scanning is not a replacement for conventional methods . It ’ s just an alternative ,” said James Cappeart , a surveyor at Ayres Associates , who estimates that the survey group completes 10 % to 15 % of projects with the HD scanner .
– Jennifer Schmidt
“ In some cases , HD scanning is a much better solution , but conventional survey is not going away ,” he said . “ Just because it ’ s shiny and new doesn ’ t mean it ’ s going to replace the world .”
Many projects , particularly those of a smaller magnitude , are best served with traditional survey methods . For instance , if a client needs just a single city block surveyed for a reconstruction project , HD scanning would provide far more data than necessary .
“ It just doesn ’ t make sense to use HD scanning to collect that data ,” Cappeart said . “ Our conventional methods can do it just about as quickly and with a lot less office time on the back end to prepare our deliverable .”
Conventional methods are often the most viable choice for rural projects , such as a survey through a cornfield or at a site with a great deal of high vegetation where data is needed behind or underneath grass or tree limbs . Many bridge surveys can be done either way but don ’ t need the level of detail collected in an HD scan , leading surveyors to complete them with conventional methods .
“ There are some applications that HD scanning is made for ,” Cappeart said , citing a recent example that
CONVENTIONAL SURVEY STILL CHOICE METHOD FOR MANY PROJECTS W ith high-definition (HD) laser scanning becoming more common as a surveying tool for spatial data collection, why would anyone still opt for conventional survey on a project? Experts say it all depends on individual goals and needs. “HD scanning is not a replacement for conventional methods. It’s just an alternative,” said James Cappeart, a surveyor at Ayres Associates, who estimates that the survey group completes 10% to 15% of projects with the HD scanner. “In some cases, HD scanning is a much better solution, but conventional survey is not going away,” he said. “Just because it’s shiny and new doesn’t mean it’s going to replace the world.” Many projects, particularly those of a smaller magnitude, are best served with traditional survey methods. For instance, if a client needs just a single city block surveyed for a reconstruction project, HD scanning would provide far more data than necessary. “It just doesn’t make sense to use HD scanning to collect that data,” Cappeart said. “Our conventional methods can do it just about as quickly and with a lot less office time on the back end to prepare our deliverable.” Conventional methods are often the most viable choice for rural projects, such as a survey through a cornfield or at a site with a great deal of high vegetation where data is needed behind or underneath grass or tree limbs. Many bridge surveys can be done either way but don’t need the level of detail collected in an HD scan, leading surveyors to complete them with conventional methods. “There are some applications that HD scanning is made for,” Cappeart said, citing a recent example that involved surveying a high-traffic interchange in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Using HD scanning was the more feasible choice because it was far safer and faster than the conventional survey method. “It \H]HYYY][Y\]B۸&]\H]]\H^K'B$[Y\ZY