Trends Spring 2017 - Page 10

Engineers benefit during design
survey and GPS ; placed on design and construction plans or master utility maps ; and delivered to the client before construction begins . If the client does not wish to have the information integrated into their construction plans , test hole data sheets are provided that include all pertinent information for the located utility .
“ When we look at as-built plans or talk to a utility owner , they might think it ’ s an 18-inch ductile iron pipe . Then , when we dig a test hole , it might end up being a 12-inch HDPE ( high-density polyethylene ), That ’ s important information to know ,” said Michael Wolf , Ayres ’ SUE leader in Florida . “ With vacuum excavation , we give them the actual size , the type of material , and how deep it is , in case it ’ s different than what ’ s on the plans . We give them the exact horizontal and vertical position of every utility in the scope .”
The data also shows which underground utilities conflict with a proposed design .
“ Original design drawings frequently have inaccuracies ,” Wolf said , “ especially if the building site or roadway is decadesold and has had redevelopment . This can make for a dangerous game of chance when digging at a site without due diligence . Knowing potential conflicts beforehand significantly reduces chances for problems and speeds up potential relocation design , which keeps projects on schedule and within budget .
“ If you ’ re going out there blind , and a contractor is beginning to dig , suddenly he comes to a roadblock and says , ‘ Hey , no one told me this was going to be here ,’” Wolf said . “ I ’ ve seen some road construction projects that were shut down .”

Engineers benefit during design

Having SUE data is also extremely helpful for engineers and designers , Ash said .
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10│TRENDS
survey and GPS; placed on design and construction plans or master utility maps; and delivered to the client before construction begins. If the client does not wish to have the information integrated into their construction plans, test hole data sheets are provided that include all pertinent information for the located utility. “When we look at as-built plans or talk to a utility owner, they might think it’s an 18-inch ductile iron pipe. Then, when we dig a test hole, it might end up being a 12-inch HDPE (high-density polyethylene), That’s important information to know,” said Michael Wolf, Ayres’ SUE leader in Florida. “With vacuum excavation, we give them the actual size, the type of material, and how deep it is, in case it’s different than what’s on the plans. We give them the exact horizontal and vertical position of every utility in the scope.” The data also shows which underground utilities conflict with a proposed design. “Original design drawings frequently have inaccuracies,” Wolf said, “especially if the building site or roadway is decades- old and has had redevelopment. This can make for a dangerous game of chance when digging at a site without due diligence. Knowing potential conflicts beforehand significantly reduces chances for problems and speeds up potential relocation design, which keeps projects on schedule and within budget. Engineers benefit during design “If you’re going out there blind, and a contractor is Having SUE data is also extremely helpful for engineers and designers, Ash said. beginning to dig, suddenly he comes to a roadblock and says, ‘Hey, no one told me this was going to be here,’” Wolf said. “I’ve seen some road construction projects that were shut down.” Contin YYۈYLLL8 S