Torch: U.S. LXVIII Winter 2018 - Page 15

FULVIA

JULIA MAMAEA

JULIA MAMAEA

FULVIA

Fulvia was the heir to a large fortune because she was an only child. She eventually married Mark Antony. Plutarch, a Roman essayist and biographer, described Fulvia to be the dominant partner in her marriage to Antony, and it is said that she played an important role in furthering his political career. She was quick to defend his financial and economic interests, especially when Cicero verbally attacked them, and Fulvia was soon viewed as a powerful political enemy by many. It was uncommon for men of power to regard the words and actions of women, so their fear of her is an indicator of her strong presence and mind. She also raised legions for her husband and plotted them against Octavian. Also, the Phrygian city of Eumeneia was renamed around this time period to honor Fulvia. Fulvia was the first living woman to have her face engraved on a coin.

Julia Mamaea was the mother of Emperor Severus Alexander and the younger sister of Julia Soaemias (whom we discussed earlier). Severus Alexander who was only fourteen when he began his reign, so Mamaea acted as his regent. She was very politically active and almost fulfilled all the roles of an emperor. She is said to have stabilized the Roman empire. Mamaea reversed many of Elagabalus's "scandalous policies" and sustained her power over her son throughout his reign. Unlike many other Roman emperor sons who carry serious inferiority complexes, Severus Alexander appreciated his mother's assistance and eventually named her consors imperii (imperial consort). This title made Julia the first officially recognized empress in Roman history. Although Marcus Aurelius had offered this position to Lucius Verus, never had a woman earned this title before.

References:

http://www.livius.org/articles/person/julia-mamaea/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/women/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/julia-mamaea-c-190-235

POWERFUL ROMAN WOMEN

POWERFUL ROMAN WOMEN

POWERFUL ROMAN WOMEN

References:

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Fulvia-wife-of-Mark-Antony

https://history775.wordpress.com/study-fulvia/

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