The Tribe Report 4. The Change Management Issue - Page 19

Do your employees have a comprehensive and current go-to place for information about a major change initiative? That can make all the difference in their level of comfort with the change. One thing we often hear in discovery sessions with corporate employees is that during change, reliable information is hard to find. This is especially true for a long rollout. Without access to appropriate information, employees undergo unnecessary stress and anxiety, rumors are spread and trust in management can be eroded. A microsite provides an efficient and effective one-stop shop for everything related to the change. The site can also provide a venue for two-way communication, allowing employees to ask questions and share experiences. And when the change process is complete, the microsite can be taken down. In some instances we would recommend a true microsite. What I mean by this is a stand-alone site with a separate URL from any other existing sites. Often when you’re experiencing a really large change or a change that takes a significant amount of time to come to fruition, this is a great option. But for most changes, rather than create a new and separate microsite, you might be better served by simply developing a sub-site of your current intranet. This can be just as effective and often easier to implement. The goal is to include all the communications in the same place – and to update the information continuously. Setting up a change blog can help with this. It’s also a great way to field some questions and comments so you have two-way communication. With a blog you can have several different authors giving you the opportunity to have communications from leadership, change managers and even regular employees. Another option is to put all communications within a forum. This is great for change that requires many discussions between teams or employees. Even if you add an additional site, this is a good supplemental feature. Employees need to know where to go to ask questions and a forum makes it easier to monitor the answers being given. A good way to give yourself a microsite feel without having to build the infrastructure is to add a page to your existing site. Link it directly from the home page and give it a place in your main-level navigation. Also, don’t forget the power of design. A simple trick is to give the change initiative its own branding with a color and style treatment. It will help the change communication stand out, especially if it lives in multiple places. The most important thing is consistency. Not just consistency in the message, but in the look and location of the communications. Change is always hard because you can’t control every aspect of it, but what you can control is how you communicate it. SOFTWARE FOR MICROSITES 1 SQUARESPACE 2 SNAPCOMMS www.squarespace.com RELEASED 2003 FEATURED IN The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNET and Businessweek SHORTHAND “The platform behind exceptional ideas” STRENGTH “Powers tens of thousands of sites, with billions of monthly hits” Goleta, Calif. 1-805-715-0300 www.snapcomms.com FOUNDED 2002 CLIENTS INCLUDE Virgin Mobile, Cox, KPMG SHORTHAND “A better way to communicate with employees” STRENGTH “Technology to solve an internal communication problem” SUMMER 2012 | 19