The Hub November 2016 - Page 25

At the beginning of the twentieth century Windsor and Detroit ' s primary mode of trade transportation was a combination of the railroad and the ferry

The construction of the Ambassador International Bridge , or more commonly Ambassador Bridge , started on August 16 , 1927 and was completed November 6 , 1929 , several months ahead of schedule .
It was welcomed with open arms - in the first three weeks of operation the bridge was crossed by 124,629 personal vehicles , 3413 trucks and 53,904 pedestrians on two walking paths .
But getting the plans for a bridge from blueprint to reality was not easy .
At the beginning of the twentieth century Windsor and Detroit ' s primary mode of trade transportation was a combination of the railroad and the ferry . Economic factors and time management created issues with these shipping methods and plans to create a physical connection between the two cities arose .
The first plan to improve trade was to build a railway tunnel that would run under the Detroit River . In the late 1860s , Canadian and US railroad leaders approved the building of the rail tunnel . It was started in the fall of 1871 and shut down shortly after . Labour disputes erupted among the workers over the difference in wages . The completion of the tunnel was also stopped due to the death of two workers near the end of the project . This resulted in the tunnels being sealed .
Other attempts to create a link between the Windsor and Detroit through the construction of a bridge also failed , due to structural issues and powerful companies who opposed the idea .
In 1920 , after the end of the First World War , Detroit and Windsor leaders again discussed the need for a bridge . Charles
Evan Fowler and Gustav Lindenthal , two New York architects , came up with a two tier design and were supported by key members of the Windsor community . A man by the name of Russell Scott was chosen to raise funds for the project . Once again the plan fell short , this time due to opposition of Scott ' s fundraising techniques .
Meanwhile , at the beginning of the twentieth century , the first automobiles had started to roll off the assembly lines and onto the streets . The automobile became a social , physical and cultural aspect of life but crossing between Windsor and Detroit was costly . People and cars lined up to get access to ferries that would transport them over the murky waters of the Detroit River . At first the ferries were able to adapt to keep up with the traffic flow , but as more people flocked to the docks , problems started to arise . By the late 1920s , the long lineups and delays resulted in travellers demanding an alternative to the outdated method .
One more man took a swing at the proverbial ball . Joseph A . Bower took over the proposed project in 1924 . Bower brought together several important business leaders and won the support to re-start the project .
Essex County citizens were the first to vote on the new bridge plan in the winter of 1925-26 . The majority of citizens in the county approved the proposal to build the bridge . The communities of Windsor , Sandwich , Amherstburg , Riverside and LaSalle followed suit . Detroit also received mass approval from its citizens . Joseph Bower announced after the results , “ We ’ re through arguing let us move forward .”
After raising $ 27 million in funds and hiring some of the best architectural companies in the country the project began . They started from the ground up , with the foundation , two
At the beginning of the twentieth century Windsor and Detroit's primary mode of trade transportation was a combination of the railroad and the ferry The construction of the Ambassador International Bridge, or more commonly Ambassador Bridge, started on August 16, 1927 and was completed November 6, 1929, several months ahead of schedule. It was welcomed with open arms - in the first three weeks of operation the bridge was crossed by 124,629 personal vehicles, 3413 trucks and 53,904 pedestrians on two walking paths. But getting the plans for a bridge from blueprint to reality was not easy. At the beginning of the twentieth century Windsor and Detroit's primary mode of trade transportation was a combination of the railroad and the ferry. Economic factors and time management created issues with these shipping methods and plans to create a physical connection between the two cities arose. The first plan to improve trade was to build a railway tunnel that would run under the Detroit River. In the late 1860s, Canadian and US railroad leaders approved the building of the rail tunnel. It was started in the fall of 1871 and shut down shortly after. Labour disputes erupted among the workers over the difference in wages. The completion of the tunnel was also stopped due to the death of two workers near the end of the project. This resulted in the tunnels being sealed. Other attempts to create a link between the Windsor and Detroit through the construction of a bridge also failed, due to structural issues and powerful companies who opposed the idea. In 1920, after the end of the First World War, Detroit and Windsor leaders again discussed the need for a bridge.Charles Evan Fowler and Gustav Lindenthal, two New York architects, came up with a two tier design and were supported by key members of the Windsor community. A man by the name ق\[\[Z\H[܈HڙX ۘBYZ[H[[ܝ \[YHYH][ۈو ™[Z\[X\]Y\˂YX[[K]HY[[وH[Y][\KB\]][ؚ[\Y\YٙH\[XH[\[۝HY]ˈH]][ؚ[HX[YHHX[ \X[[[\[\XوYH]ܛ[]Y[[܈[]]\K[H[\[Y\]X\™\Y\][[ܝ[Hݙ\H]\H]\قH]]]\]\H\Y\\HXHY\Y\\]HYX]\[ܙH[HYB؛[\\Y\\KHH]H NLHۙ›[]\[[^\\[Y[][\[X[[[[\]]HH]]YY] ۙH[ܙHX[H[]Hݙ\X[[ \K\ݙ\HYڙX[ NL \Y]\]\[[\ܝ[\[\XY\[ۂH\ܝK\\HڙX \^[H]^[\HH\HۈH]˜YH[[H[\و NLKLHXZܚ]Hو]^[š[H[H\ݙYH[Z[HYKB[][]Y\و[܋[X [Z\\]\YB[T[HYZ] ]][XZ]YX\\ݘ[H]]^[ˈ\\[[YY\H\['x&\HY\Z[]\[ݙHܝ\ 'BY\Z\[ Z[[ۈ[[[\[YHوB\\]X\[\[Y\[H[HHڙXY[^H\YHHܛ[\ ]H[][ۋ‚