The Explorer Magazine Fall 2022 - Page 14

Join us for Animal Tales !

Our Park Naturalists and volunteers come to your local library each month to share a story about a native animal and lead a craft or activity . These programs are FREE to attend and are most appropriate for preschool to upper elementary age children . Advance registration is required by contacting your library .
SEPTEMBER I ’ m Trying to Love Spiders by Bethany Barton
OCTOBER Bats in the Library by Brian Lies
NOVEMBER Wild Birds by Joanne Ryder
DECEMBER The Reason for a Flower by Ruth Heller
I ’ m Trying to Love Spiders will help you see these amazing arachnids in a whole new light , from their awesomely excessive eight eyes , to the seventy-five pounds of bugs a spider can eat in a single year ! And you ’ re sure to feel better knowing you have a better chance of being struck by lightning than being fatally bitten by a spider . Comforting , right ? No ? Either way , there ’ s heaps more information in here to help you forget your fears . . . or at least laugh a lot !
The enchantment of story time is near — come bats , come one and all , and gather around for the tale of the night . Roam the book-filled halls on this inky evening as the bats wander around the library and cause all sorts of mischief . Brian Lies ’ joyful critters and their nocturnal celebration cast library visits in a new light . Even the youngest of readers will want to join the batty book-fest .
Starlings line telephone wires against a salmon sky at dawn as a red-winged blackbird squawks at a nervous cat . An unnamed girl with a birdwatching hobby silently witnesses the activity of her feathered friends , from robins and jays to sparrows and geese . This colorful tribute should take wing with budding ornithologists and nature lovers alike .
Discover the amazing world of seeds and pollination with The Reason for a Flower . Featuring bright illustrations and a simple text , each page walks you through the journey of a seed and explains the important parts of a flower , of germination , of food-based plants , and more ! The reason for a flower is to manufacture seeds , but Ruth Heller shares a lot more about parts of plants and their functions in her trademark rhythmic style .
CLAYTON-LIBERTY TWP Tuesdays at 10:30 a . m . Call library at ( 317 ) 539-2991 to register in advance Sept . 6 , Oct . 4 , Nov . 1 , Dec . 6
MONROVIA Tuesdays at 1 p . m .
Call library at ( 317 ) 996-4307 to register in advance Sept . 6 , Oct . 4 , Nov . 1 , Dec . 6
PLAINFIELD-GUILFORD TWP Wednesdays at 10 a . m . Call library at ( 317 ) 839-6602 to register in advance Sept . 7
BROWNSBURG Wednesdays at 4 p . m . Call library at ( 317 ) 852-3167 to register in advance Sept . 7 , Oct . 5 , Nov . 2 , Dec . 7
JAMESTOWN Thursdays at 3 p . m . Call library at ( 765 ) 676-6190 to register in advance Sept . 8 , Oct . 6 , Nov . 3 , Dec . 8
AVON Fridays at 2 p . m .
Call library at ( 317 ) 272-4818 to register in advance Sept . 9 , Oct . 7 , Nov . 4 , Dec . 9
DANVILLE Fridays at 4 p . m . Call library at ( 317 ) 745-2604 to register in advance Sept . 9 , Oct . 7 , Nov . 4 , Dec . 9

RECOMMENDED READING FOR ADULTS OUT OF THE WOODS BY JULIA CORBETT

Have you ever wondered about society ’ s desire to cultivate the perfect lawn , why we view some animals as “ good ” and some as “ bad ,” or even thought about the bits of nature inside everyday items – toothbrushes , cell phones , and coffee mugs ? In this fresh and introspective collection of essays , Julia Corbett examines nature in our lives with all of its ironies and contradictions by seamlessly integrating personal narratives with morsels of highly digestible science and research . Each story delves into an overlooked aspect of our relationship with nature — insects , garbage , backyards , noise , open doors , animals , and language — and how we cover our tracks .
With a keen sense of irony and humor and an awareness of the miraculous in the mundane , Julia recognizes the contradictions of contemporary life . She confronts the owner of a high-end market who insists on keeping his doors open in all temperatures . She takes us on a trip to a new mall with a replica of a trout stream that once flowed nearby . The phrase “ out of the woods ” guides us through layers of meaning to a contemplation of grief , remembrance , and resilience .
Out of the Woods leads to surprising insights into the products , practices , and phrases we take for granted in our everyday encounters with nature and encourages us all to consider how we might re-value or reimagine our relationships with nature in our everyday lives .
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