The Coshocton County Beacon July 11, 2018 - Page 8

8 THE BEACON www . coshoctonbeacontoday . com JULY 11 , 2018

| MEMORIES

JULY 14 , 1958
The annual soapbox derby was held and 30 local boys participated in it . Held at the Derby Downs outside of Akron , the boys raced to the finish to see who would come out on top . Sycamore Elementary 6th grader Dick Hoop , son of Sherriff and Mrs . William Hoop Jr . walked away the winner . William McQuay , representative of Chevrolet , presented him with a trophy and invited him to return next month for the All-American Soap Box Derby .
JULY 8 , 1968
Saturday evening , at the Pilgrim Hills Conference Center near Tiverton , William Thompson of Warsaw became one of 10 people in the world , and one of four in the USA , to receive the “ Leo Award .” The award was given by the Lions Club to members for outstanding public relations . Thompson was selected for the award at the international convention held last month in Dallas .
JULY 9 , 1978
The Sandlot State Baseball Championship belonged to a Coshocton team . The 20-5 Stone Container team snatched the title from the Marion Elks with a 5-2 victory . They advanced to the ABC National Tournament in Lenoir , North Carolina Aug . 4 . The game also saw pitcher Larry Wright win his ninth consecutive game .
JULY 10 , 1988
Coshocton was a busy place . The Ohio Gold Wing Riders Association wrapped up the final day of their convention . The event was capped by a parade of more than 600 motorcycles , including a precision performance team from North Carolina , and a contest where Mayor Dan Moody judged the best-lighted bike . This was the third year the association had held its convention in Coshocton . Today also saw the dedication of the newly-expanded and renovated Hilltop Golf Course . Leo Prindle gave a speech thanking the community and recounting the history of the course . Mayor Moody and Board of Commissioners president Harold Turner shared fond memories they had made on the course , as did former co-owner and retired business man Seward Schooler .
All information was obtained from microfilm of the Coshocton Tribune at the Coshocton County Library .

Guthrie participates in 100-mile trail run

By Beth Scott beth @ coshoctoncountybeacon . com
COSHOCTON – Grant Guthrie has been an active runner for the past five years and last June , he participated in his third 100-mile run . The Western States Endurance Run was held June 21 – 24 and began in Squaw Valley , CA and ended in Auburn , CA .
“ I like just getting out in nature and enjoying the outdoors ,” said Guthrie . “ When I first started , it helped me lose about 70 pounds . It ’ s really changed a lot of things .”
Guthrie heard about the race from a friend who competes in local races in Coshocton and from watching videos online of the race .
In the first four and a half miles of the race , runners climb 2,550 vertical feet from the valley floor to Emigrant Pass . From the pass , they run on original trails used by the gold and silver miners of the 1850s and travel west , climbing 15,540 feet and descending 22,970 feet before reaching Auburn .
This was the 45th year for the race and the ninth hottest race day in history . With a high of 98 degrees ( 110 degrees in the canyons ), Guthrie said the heat was one of the hardest obstacles to overcome .
“ With it being so hot , I had to drink a ton ,” he said . “ I wasn ’ t used to low humidity . I stopped sweating after mile 35 so I had to take in more water and electrolytes .” Another hurdle for Guthrie was crossing through a river around mile 78 at midnight . Each participant had to finish the race in 30 hours . Each runner who crossed the finish line before the 30-
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0003 _ 050416 hour mark received a belt buckle . Guthrie started the race at 5 a . m . Saturday and finished at 4:15 a . m . Sunday morning .
“ A big memory for me was coming in on mile 62 and I got to see my brother ,” he said . “ I got to run with my brother for 20 miles after that . That was pretty cool . Another memory for me was at the top of a climb , they told us to look back . The sun was rising over Lake Tahoe over the mountain .”
“ I like just getting out in nature and enjoying the outdoors . When I first started , it helped me lose about 70 pounds . It ’ s really changed a lot of things .”
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THE 1ST ANNUAL Peaches Pub n ’ Grub BENEFIT P KER RUN JULY 21 ST , 2018 108 Main St . Warsaw , Ohio 43844 740-824-8087

BENEFIT OF CHOICE :
Family & Friends Battling Cancer
Hog Roast - 50 / 50 & Live Music
Band : Blackhand Hooch starts @ 8:30PM
- Grant Guthrie
During the run , there were 21 aid stations with 10 major medical checkpoints along the way that had water and other refreshments to refuel .
Up until the race in June , Guthrie has run 1,200 miles this year alone and the most he has run is 80 miles in one week . This was his 13th endurance race , which includes anything over a marathon run .
Guthrie said that this year , he is planning on running in a 50-mile race in Ohio and two races at Mohican and Salt Fork toward the end of the year .
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1st Bike out at Noon • Last Bike in at 6:00PM
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www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com Th e annual soapbox derby was held and 30 local boys participated in it. Held at the Derby Downs out- side of Akron, the boys raced to the fi nish to see who would come out on top. Sycamore Elementary 6th grader Dick Hoop, son of Sherriff and Mrs. William Hoop Jr. walked away the winner. William McQuay, representative of Chevrolet, presented him with a trophy and invited him to return next month for the All-American Soap Box Derby. JULY 8, 1968 Saturday evening, at the Pilgrim Hills Conference Center near Tiverton, William Th ompson of Warsaw became one of 10 people in the world, and one of four in the USA, to receive the “Leo Award.” Th e award was given by the Lions Club to members for outstanding public relations. Th ompson was selected for the award at the international convention held last month in Dallas. JULY 9, 1978 Th e Sandlot State Baseball Championship belonged to a Coshocton team. Th e 20-5 Stone Container team snatched the title from the Marion Elks with a 5-2 vic- tory. Th ey advanced to the ABC National Tournament in Lenoir, North Carolina Aug. 4. Th e game also saw pitcher Larry Wright win his ninth consecutive game. JULY 10, 1988 Coshocton was a busy place. Th e Ohio Gold Wing Riders Association wrapped up the fi nal day of their convention. Th e event was capped by a parade of more than 600 motorcycles, including a precision performance team from North Carolina, and a contest where Mayor Dan Moody judged the best-lighted bike. Th is was the third year the association had held its convention in Coshocton. Today also saw the ded- ication of the newly-expanded and renovated Hilltop Golf Course. Leo Prindle gave a speech thanking the community and recounting the history of the course. Mayor Moody and Board of Commissioners president Harold Turner shared fond memories they had made on the course, as did former co-owner and retired business man Seward Schooler. All information was obtained from microfi lm of the Coshocton Tribune at the Coshocton County Library. Guthrie participates in 100-mile trail run By Beth Scott beth@coshoctoncountybeacon.com COSHOCTON – Grant Guthrie has been an active runner for the past fi ve years and last June, he participated in his third 100-mile run. Th e Western States Endurance Run was held June 21 – 24 and began in Squaw Valley, CA and ended in Auburn, CA. “I like just getting out in nature and enjoying the out- doors,” said Guthrie. “When I fi rst started, it helped me lose about 70 pounds. It’s really changed a lot of things.” Guthrie heard about the race from a friend who com- petes in local races in Coshocton and from watching videos online of the race. In the fi rst four and a half miles of the race, runners climb 2,550 vertical feet from the valley fl oor to Emi- grant Pass. From the pass, they run on original trails used by the gold and silver miners of the 1850s and travel west, climbing 15,540 feet and descending 22,970 feet before reaching Auburn. Th is was the 45th year for the race and the ninth hottest race day in history. With a high of 98 degrees (110 degrees in the canyons), Guthrie said the heat was one of the hardest obstacles to overcome. “With it being so hot, I had to drink a ton,” he said. “I wasn’t used to low humidity. I stopped sweating after mile 35 so I had to take in more water and electrolytes.” Another hurdle for Guthrie was crossing through a river around mile 78 at midnight. Each participant had to fi nish the race in 30 hours. Each runner who crossed the fi nish line before the 30- Proud to serve the people of Coshocton and surrounding communities since 1896! Specializing in Custom Design, Etching and Carving of Fine Memorials Granite • Marble • Bronze • Mausoleums Cemetery Lettering & Cleaning 1132 Cemetery Drive • Coshocton • 740.622.5833 www.milliganmemorials.com • e-mail: millimem@clover.net hour mark received a belt buckle. Guthrie started the race at 5 a.m. Saturday and fi nished at 4:15 a.m. Sunday morning. “A big memory for me was coming in on mile 62 and I got to see my brother,” he said. “I got to run with my brother for 20 miles after that. Th at was pretty cool. An- other memory for me was at the top of a climb, they told us to look back. Th e sun was rising over Lake Tahoe over the mountain.” “I like just gett ing out in nature and enjoying the outdoors. When I fi rst started, it helped me lose about 70 pounds. It’s really changed a lot of things.” - Grant Guthrie During the run, there were 21 aid stations with 10 ma- jor medical checkpoints along the way that had water and other refreshments to refuel WVFFR&6RVRwWF&R2'V#֖W0F2V"RBFR7BR2'V2֖W2RvVVF2v227FVGW&6R&6Rv66VFW2FrfW"&F'VwWF&R6BFBF2V"R2r'VpS֖R&6RBGv&6W2B6@6Bf&Fv&BFRVBbFRV"2W7FR'&DW'bbr&70( "֗'&"WF6p( "6v2B&W'0( "vFrbfV6RWGFW&p( "v72WF6p( "67&VV&BbVB&W70( "ԆW6RFvFpTŒBS5SC`*T$U0TŒ#W66VBFW'2g&WУsCc#"cS#vVB#"6VF"7B667FDR5BTV6W2V"( w'V $TTdBU"%TथTŒ#5B#7Bv'6rC3C@sCӃ#BӃp$TTdBb44Sf֖ǒbg&VG0&GFƖr66W &Vv7G&F7F'G03@V6W2V r&7BУSSbƗfRW60&C&6@67F'G23ТC#RW"&R( "CR76VvW 7B&RWBB( "7B&RBcХV6W2V"( w'V"'V6WRRVvW0FW''( 2FfW&667FVvW0DR$T4