The Coshocton County Beacon July 11, 2018 - Page 16

16 THE BEACON www . coshoctonbeacontoday . com JULY 11 , 2018
Josie Sellers | Beacon
Neal Lillibridge is pictured outside of Rural King where he works as a sales associate . The 94-year-old has worked his whole life so he figured why stop now ?

Lillibridge doesn ’ t let age stop him from working

By Josie Sellers josie @ coshoctoncountybeacon . com
COSHOCTON – Neal Lillibridge has worked his whole life so he figured why stop now at the age of 94 ?
“ There is a limit to how much fishing and traveling you can do ,” he said .
Lillibridge is a sales associate at Rural King on Second Street , where he ’ s been employed for about three weeks .
“ The job I got hired for was to water plants , but that only takes me about an hour to an hour and a half now so I work on odd jobs inside ,” he said .
Lillibridge was born and raised in Tyndall with his seven brothers and five sisters . His first job was helping his father in the garden . When he got older he worked for the railroad , the Carnation Company , American Artworks , GE and The Beach Company .
“ I wasn ’ t with the railroad too long because it was too hot and too cold , but I was with the Carnation Co . for 29 years and six months ,” Lillibridge said . “ I didn ’ t like GE when I went there so I went back to Carnation . It closed though so from there I went to The Beach Company .”
He put in another 29 years at The Beach Company , but even after all that time he still wasn ’ t ready to retire .
“ I was the press room foreman and was 93 when I left ,” Lillibridge said . “ The only reason I left was because of my age they were afraid I might get hurt . Work ’ s all I ’ ve known though so I have no regrets about going back .” In addition to being a hard worker , Lillibridge also is a

Keep pets cool , comfortable and safe this summer

Contributed | metrocreativeconnection . com
U . S . Army veteran . He was drafted while working at Carnation and served in Europe during World War II .
“ I was with the Army engineers and was in for four years ,” Lillibridge said . “ We repaired things and made pontoon bridges .”
His 147th Engineering Combat Battalion landed at Normandy .
“ There were bullets flying all around you there ,” Lillibridge said . “ I lost a bunch of real close buddies that day .”
He was a Buck Sergeant and got along with most people he served with and still prides himself on getting along with others .
“ That ’ s because of church ,” Lillibridge said . “ I was introduced to Central Christian Church when I was 13 years old by a little girl who I ended up marrying when I was 20 . We had our tough times , but we got through them because we had church . I think any man or woman can get through their problems if they look toward Jesus Christ to help solve them .”
He lost his first wife when she was in her late 40s , but ended up marrying her sister , who passed away at the age of 87 . “ I was in the family for 71 years ,” Lillibridge said . He has two sons , Ronald and John and is affectionately known to many as Uncle Neal . “ All in all I ’ ve had a good life ,” Lillibridge said . “ I don ’ t dwell on the past . I wake up and think about tomorrow .”

Lyme Disease and ticks

“ Lyme disease is a major player right now ,” said Dr . Jeff Poland from A-1 Vet Care . “ More and more people are being diagnosed with it and if you talk to health boards it ’ s not coming from other locations . It ’ s here in Coshocton County .”
Dr . Poland advised pet owners to especially be on the lookout for ticks if their four legged friend is around leaf litter or long stem grasses .
“ Create a barrier to these or try not to have them around where your pet will be ,” he said . “ You also can use a tick and flea prevention . Our pets are at a much higher risk for ticks than you and I because they cover more ground and are closer to it . Once on your pet a tick will usually go to the neck region or around the ears .” There also is a Lyme Disease vaccine for dogs . “ Whether or not they need it depends on the level of what you do with your dog ,” Poland said . “ If it ’ s a hunting dog or one that walks or hikes with you , especially in the woods or areas where ticks are known to exist you might want to get it .”
Summer may be a time for vacations and recreational activities for human beings , but pets may not be privy to the same luxuries . Summer recreation may not always include our four-legged friends , as summer heat and other issues can pose a threat to companion animals . As a result , pet parents must make pet safety a priority when the weather heats up .
The Humane Society of the United States says that the summer months can be uncomfortable and dangerous for pets . Temperatures that may be tolerable for adults and children who are dressed accordingly may not be so for animals covered in fur . It ’ s vital to help pets stay comfortable and safe as summer temperatures heat up . Pet parents also must be aware of particular dangers that go hand-in-hand with summertime activities .
Practice vehicle safety . It is never acceptable to leave pets in parked cars , even for a minute . Temperatures inside vehicles can rise quickly and considerably in a matter of minutes , even with the windows opened slightly . HSUS says on an 85-degree-day , temperatures inside parked cars can reach 102 F within 10 minutes . Pets can suffer irreversible and even fatal organ damage in that period of time . If you have to run errands , keep dogs and cats at home where they will be more comfortable .
Stay off of hot asphalt . If you ’ ve ever walked on the hot sand or an asphalt driveway on a hot day , you understand just how scorching those surfaces can get . Dogs and cats do not have protective shoes to wear , so safeguard the delicate pads of their paws by keeping companion animals off of hot surfaces . Schedule walks in the early morning or late afternoon when temperatures are cooler .
Schedule a pet grooming visit . The American Veterinary Medical Foundation suggests speaking with your veterinarian to see if it ’ s appropriate for your pet to get clipped shorter or to be shaved in the summer . But a fur coat can offer protection from the sun , so weigh the pros and cons before taking action .
Provide a way for pets to cool off . If you ’ re hot , chances are your pet is hot , too . Offer a means for pets too cool off , such as a wading pool when you are outside . Offer plenty of fresh water . Keep pets that do not enjoy the heat indoors with the air conditioner running on hot days .
Look for indicators of heat stress . The American Veterinary Association says heat stress is marked by heavy panting , dry or bright red gums , thick drool , vomiting , diarrhea , or wobbly legs . Move pets exhibiting such symptoms to a cool place , drape a damp towel over the animal ’ s body , rewetting the cloth frequently , and get the animal to the vet as soon as you possibly can .
Exercise caution in the water . Dogs can get swept away by rip currents just like human swimmers . If you will be boating , invest in a life jacket for your pooch and look for water hazards , such as currents , sink holes , and blue-green algae in lakes and ponds .
16 THE BEACON www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com JULY 11, 2018 Lillibridge doesn’t let age stop him from working By Josie Sellers josie@coshoctoncountybeacon.com Josie Sellers | Beacon Neal Lillibridge is pictured outside of Rural King where he works as a sales associate. The 94-year-old has worked his whole life so he fi gured why stop now? COSHOCTON – Neal Lillibridge has worked his whole life so he fi gured why stop now at the age of 94? “Th ere is a limit to how much fi shing and traveling you can do,” he said. Lillibridge is a sales associate at Rural King on Second Street, where he’s been employed for about three weeks. “Th e job I got hired for was to water plants, but that only takes me about an hour to an hour and a half now so I work on odd jobs inside,” he said. Lillibridge was born and raised in Tyndall with his sev- en brothers and fi ve sisters. His fi rst job was helping his father in the garden. When he got older he worked for the railroad, the Carnation Company, American Artworks, GE and Th e Beach Company. “I wasn’t with the railroad too long because it was too hot and too cold, but I was with the Carnation Co. for 29 years and six months,” Lillibridge said. “I didn’t like GE when I went there so I went back to Carnation. It closed though so from there I went to Th e Beach Company.” He put in another 29 years at Th e Beach Company, but even after all that time he still wasn’t ready to retire. “I was the press room foreman and was 93 when I left,” Lillibridge said. “Th e only reason I left was because of my age they were afraid I might get hurt. Work’s all I’ve known though so I have no regrets about going back.” In addition to being a hard worker, Lillibridge also is a U.S. Army veteran. He was drafted while working at Car- nation and served in Europe during World War II. “I was with the Army engineers and was in for four years,” Lillibridge said. “We repaired things and made pontoon bridges.” His 147th Engineering Combat Battalion landed at Normandy. “Th ere were bullets fl ying all around you there,” Lillibridge said. “I lost a bunch of real close buddies that day.” He was a Buck Sergeant and got along with most people he served with and still prides himself on getting along with others. “Th at’s because of church,” Lillibridge said. “I was introduced to Central Christian Church when I was 13 years old by a little girl who I ended up marrying when I was 20. We had our tough times, but we got through them because we had church. I think any man or woman can get through their problems if they look toward Jesus Chri ЁѼͽٔѡt)!Ё́Ёݥݡ݅́͡ȁє̰)她ȁͥѕȰݡ͕݅䁅Ёѡ)ܸ+q$݅́ѡ䁙Ȁā啅̳t1ɥͅ)!́ݼͽ̰I)́ѥѕ)ݸѼ䁅́U9+q'eٔt1ɥͅq$e)ݕѡи$݅ѡЁѽɽܻt)-́хͅѡ́յ) ɥѕɽɕѥٕѥ)1嵔͕͔ѥ+q1嵔͕͔́ȁȁɥЁܳtͅȸ))AɽāYЁ ɔq5ɔɔɔ)͕ݥѠЁԁхѼѠɑ)ӊéЁɽѡȁѥ̸%ӊéɔ ͡)ѽ չ今t)ȸA٥͕Ёݹ́Ѽ䁉ѡ)Ёȁѥ́ѡȁȁɥ́ɽչ)ѕȁȁѕɅ̸͕+q ɕєɥȁѼѡ͔ȁ䁹ЁѼٔѡ)ɽչݡɔȁЁݥtͅqeԁͼ)͔ѥɕٕѥ=ȁ́ɔЁՍ)ȁɥͬȁѥ́ѡԁ$͔ѡ䁍ٕ)ɔɽչɔ͕ȁѼи=ȁЁѥ)ݥՅ䁝Ѽѡɕȁɽչѡ̻t)Qɔͼ́1嵔͕͔مȁ̸+q]ѡȁȁЁѡ䁹Ё́ѡٕ)ݡЁԁݥѠȁtAͅq%ӊéչд)ȁѡЁ݅́ȁ́ݥѠ԰)ѡݽ́ȁɕ́ݡɔѥ́ɔݸѼЁ)Ё݅ЁѼЁлt)Mյȁ䁉ѥȁمѥ́ɕɕѥ)ѥ٥ѥ́ȁյ̰Ё́䁹ЁɥѼ)ѡͅɥ̸Mյȁɕɕѥ䁹Ё݅)Ցȁȵɥ̰́յȁЁ)ѡȁՕ͔́ѡɕЁѼ̸)ɕձаЁɕ́ЁЁͅ䁄ɥɥݡ)ѡݕѡȁ́)Q!յM䁽ѡUѕMхѕ́́ͅѡЁѡ)յȁѡ́չхɽ)ȁ̸QɅɕ́ѡЁ䁉ѽɅȁձ)ɕݡɔɕ͕ɑ䁵䁹Ё)ͼȁٕ́ɕȸ%ӊé٥хѼ́х)х́ͅյȁѕɅɕ́Ё)AЁɕ́ͼЁ݅ɔѥձȁ́ѡ)ݥѠյѥѥ٥ѥ̸)AɅѥٕͅ丁%Ёٕ́ȁхѼٔ)́ɭ̰ٕȁєQɅɕ)ٕͥ́ɥ͔ե䁅ͥɅ䁥)ѕȁѕ̰ٕݥѠѡݥ́ͱд)丁!MUĹͅԵɕ䰁ѕɅɕ́ͥ)ɭ́ɕȁݥѡѕ̸Á)ՙȁɕٕٕͥхɝѡ)ɥѥ%ԁٔѼոɅ̰́)́Ёݡɔѡݥɔх)Mх䁿Ёи%׊eٕٔȁ݅ѡ)ͅȁЁɥٕ݅䁽Ё䰁ԁչх)Ё܁͍ɍѡ͔ə́и́)́Ёٔɽѕѥٔ́͡ѼݕȰͼͅՅɐ)ѡє́ѡȁ́䁭)́Ёə̸Mձ݅́ѡɱ)ɹȁєѕɹݡѕɅɕ́ɔȸ)MձЁɽ٥ͥиQɥYѕȴ)5չѥ՝́ݥѠ)ٕѕɥɥѼ͕ӊéɽɥєȁȁЁѼ)͡ѕȁȁѼٕ͡ѡյȸ Ё)Ёȁɽѕѥɽѡոͼݕѡɽ)́ɔхѥ)Aɽ٥݅䁙ȁ́Ѽ%׊eɔа)́ɔȁЁ́аѽ=ȁ́ȁ́ѽ)Ս́݅ݡԁɔͥ=)䁽ɕ݅͠ѕȸ-́ѡЁЁѡ)́ݥѠѡȁѥȁչЁ̸)1ȁѽ́Ёɕ̸QɥYд)ɥͽѥ́ͅЁɕ́́ɭ䁡)ѥ䁽ȁɥЁɕյ̰ѡɽٽѥ)ɡȁݽ䁱̸5ٔ́ᡥѥՍ)ѽ́ѼɅѽݕٕȁѡ)é䰁ɕݕѥѡѠɕՕѱ䰁Ёѡ)ѼѡٕЁ́ͽ́ԁͥ䁍)ɍ͔ѥѡ݅ѕȸ́Ёݕ)݅䁉ɥɕ́Ёյݥ̸%)ݥѥٕЁЁȁȁ)ȁ݅ѕȁɑ̰Ս́ɕ̰̰ͥ)Քɕ̸́