The Catalyst Issue 16 | April 2013 - Page 14

What’s next Scott & White’s goal is to perform liver transplants as well; this could happen in three years’ time. With that service, Scott & White would offer the full gamut of complex transplant services to Central Texas. More dual organ transplants are likely as well. Dr. Zehr foresees Scott & White surgeons performing five to 15 heart-kidney transplants over the next several years, as more patients need this sophisticated level of care. “When you bring transplantation into a tertiary care center, you escalate the quality of all the other programs around it,” says Dr. Zehr. “At the end of the day, everybody is a better doctor.” And patients benefit, too, knowing the healthcare experts at Scott & White continue finding ways to bring the most advanced care to them. n Dr. Jaffers is also an associate professor of surgery at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Dr. Nolan is also an assistant professor of internal medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Dr. Sanchez is also an assistant professor of medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Dr. Sareyyupoglu is also an assistant professor of surgery at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Dr. White is also an assistant professor of medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Dr. Zehr is also a professor of surgery at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. A birthday gift for Tracy Twenty-five is a lucky number for Tracy Barnett, of Giddings, Texas. Last year, he celebrated his 25th birthday. He also got the news of a lifetime on September 25, when a pair of lungs became available to relieve the young man of a debilitating disease he had battled his entire life. Mr. Barnett had bronchiectasis (a difficult to diagnose condition), and pulmonary hypertension. Both conditions made it hard to breathe, and they eventually ravaged his lungs. By the time Mr. Barnett was referred to Scott & White, and saw Kirkland Nolan, MD, head of the division of pulmonary medicine at Scott & White Hospital - Round Rock, his lungs had deteriorated to the point where he was told he may only have months to live. Mr. Barnett had to quit work and rely on oxygen tanks and breathing treatments to help him survive. Luckily, he had to wait only a month for a new set of lungs. He would be the first person at Scott & White to receive a lung transplant. Last January, Scott & White received certification for lung transplantation from the United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS), the governing body for organ transplantation. Until that point, two dozen people each year in Central Texas had to leave the area for a lung transplant. Now, more patients are counting on Scott & White for this lifesaving surgery. After a three-week hospital stay following his successful transplant and intensive care, Mr. Barnett had continued follow-up visits to Juan Sanchez, MD, medical director of the lung transplantation program, and pulmonary medicine specialist Heath White, DO. Now, Mr. Barnett feels great. “It’s wonderful to go dancing on the weekends and listen to country music. I can also run up the stairs to a movie theater with my friends, which I couldn’t do before,” he says. “Now I’m back to work driving my truck. It’s not just a career—it’s my passion!” Hear from Lisa Mitchell, a patient who received a kidney-pancreas transplant from Dr. Jaffers. Also, discover how caregivers move to action when UNOS announces an organ is available, and learn more about how organs are procured. 12 The Catalyst April 13 | sw.org