Techlandia Issue 5- 2021/2022 - Page 73

Toward Senate Bill 90’s goal of improving cybersecurity for all Oregonians, ORTSOC’s clients are organizations that typically cannot afford to staff or contract out security services, such as K-12 schools, rural governments, and other nonprofits.

“We feel this is an essential part of the 21st-century land grant mission,” said Nevin, who now serves as ORTSOC’s director. “We’re providing this service to those who wouldn’t be able to access it otherwise.”

ORTSOC will become a living lab for faculty and industry partners to conduct high-impact research. Because the center works with actual clients, researchers will have access to data unavailable elsewhere.

“This is a great opportunity to research new enterprise security techniques, monitoring techniques, or detection techniques,” Bobba said. “Companies will also be able to test some of their ideas or equipment in a real environment.”

Recognizing the importance of diversity in STEM, inclusivity is a significant component of ORTSOC by design.

“In most cases, we’re trying to figure out how to do that with existing centers or programs that have been around for a while,” said Tom Weller, EECS school head. “It’s exciting that we’re going to be able to ensure that an inclusive focus in the center is part of its structure from the ground up.”

Triple win

Charlie Kawasaki, chief technology officer of Curtiss-Wright PacStar, has been a key partner in forming ORTSOC and is excited about this unique cybersecurity education and service concept.

“The core of the center is the experiential learning, and what we’re doing is making new college grads better candidates for the large proportion of the cybersecurity jobs,” Kawasaki said. “When you talk about research, ORTSOC naturally builds a facility that can provide broader access to data for researchers, which is really important in the cybersecurity field.

“And it's a triple win because we’re able to help underserved organizations. It’s a perfect project that deserves growth and expansion.”

"We're able to help underserved organizations. It's a perfect project that deserves growth and expansion."

— Charlie Kawasaki, CTO of Curtiss-wright Pacstar

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