Sweet Auburn: The Magazine of the Friends of Mount Auburn The Art of Memory: Monuments Through Time - Page 20

People and Happenings

People and Happenings

Ken F . Starr / 1939-2013

CRAFTSMAN AND FAMILY MAN

By James Holman , Director of Cemetery Sales
During a walk on the Greek island of Delos a few years ago , I came away with a lasting impression of the countless marble remnants bearing inscriptions of those who lived centuries ago . It is the letter carver whose presence is still felt today on Delos , and undoubtedly the same will be true here at Mount Auburn , lasting proof of not just the Cemetery ’ s history , but also the indelible mark of our own letter carver , Kenneth F .“ Kenny ” Starr , who in died in February at the age of 74 .
Ken ’ s work on Mount Auburn ’ s family-owned and shared monuments spanned nearly five decades . As a young man , Ken was trained by his stepfather , Fred DiBona , in both old and new stone carving techniques . At Mount Auburn and elsewhere in Greater Boston , Ken would often be asked to use early inscription methods and tools , such as the pneumatic chisel , in keeping with the artistry of ancestral monuments , rather than modern sandblasting .
Ken ’ s inscriptions were always accurate and precise , reflecting a pride and genuine love of his work . In the early 1990s , when Mount Auburn designed several new burial areas in conjunction with its 1993 Master Plan , large-scale installations of granite required inscribing the
Above : Nobel Prize for Physics winner Julian Schwinger ’ s monument inscribed by Ken ( on a curve ) at Willow Pond Knoll Garden Above , right : Ken working on a Vesper Path inscription .
names of several unrelated individuals . It took a dedicated craftsman like Ken to keep ahead of the work , always sensitive to the individual needs of each family he served .
But this only tells one side of Ken Starr ’ s story . His love of family , community , and country will be remembered by those who had the pleasure of meeting him . Although Ken ’ s lettering in stone can be found in such distant places as Asia and Sardinia , Ken was more apt to boast of work in his hometown of Braintree , where he was a lifelong resident . His tremendous pride in his children , grandchildren , and wife of 51 years , Judy , was always evident . Ken was above all a family man , and the Mount Auburn community will miss him dearly .
Remembering One of Our Own
18 | Sweet Auburn
Mount Auburn Trustee Gordon Abbott , Jr . lost his battle with cancer on April 17 , 2013 . Gordon was a Cemetery Trustee from 1974 until 2004 , and an Honorary Trustee until his death . He became the first director of The Trustees of Reservations in 1966 ; during his 18-year tenure it became Massachusetts ’ largest independent owner of conservation land .
Gordon brought President Emeritus Bill Clendaniel to Mount Auburn in 1988 .
“ Gordon said ,‘ Mount Auburn Cemetery is looking for a new president ,’” recalls Bill .“ Gordon , why would I want to work at a cemetery ?,” I asked .“‘ Well , Bill , go have a look : Mount Auburn is not just a cemetery .’ I did , and as they say , the rest is history .”
“ Gordon understood that as the Cemetery ’ s available land diminished , it would have to widen its scope of operations ,” says Bill .“ His keen design eye and concern for the landscape was invaluable as we developed the new cemetery space that would end the talk of Mount Auburn ceasing to be an active cemetery . He was the perfect Trustee — bringing insight and energy to our discussions .”
People and Happenings Ken F. Starr / 1939- 2013 CRAFTSMAN AND FAMILY MAN By James Holman, Director of Cemetery Sales names of several unrelated individuals. It took a dedicated craftsman like Ken to keep ahead of the work, always sensitive to the individual needs of each family he served. But this only tells one side of Ken Starr’s story. His love of family, community, and country will be remembered by those who had the pleasure of meeting him. Although Ken’s lettering in stone can be found in such distant places as Asia and Sardinia, Ken was more apt to boast of work in his hometown of Braintree, where he was a lifelong resident. His tremendous pride in his children, grandchildren, and wife of 51 years, Judy, was always evident. Ken was above all a family man, and the Mount Auburn community will miss him dearly. During a walk on the Gre e k island of De los a few years ago, I came away with a lasting impression of the countless marble remnants bearing inscriptions of those who lived centuries ago. It is the letter carver whose presence is still felt today on Delos, and undoubtedly the same will be true here at Mount Auburn, lasting proof of not just the Cemetery’s history, but also the indelible mark of our own letter carver, Kenneth F. “Kenny” Starr, who in died in February at the age of 74. Ken’s work on Mount Auburn’s family-owned and shared monuments spanned nearly five decades. As a young man, Ken was trained by his stepfather, Fred DiBona, in both old and new stone carving techniques. At Mount Auburn and elsewhere in Greater Boston, Ken would often be asked to use earl 䁥͍ɥѥѡ́ѽ̰Ս́ѡյѥ)͕ݥѠѡѥ䁽Ʌյ̰)Ʌѡȁѡɸͅѥ)-é͍ɥѥ́ݕɔ)݅́Ʌєɕ͔)ɕѥɥ)եٔ́ݽɬ)%ѡɱ̰ݡ)5չЁՉɸͥ)͕ٕɅ܁ɥɕ́)չѥݥѠ̀)5ѕȁAɝ͍)ٔ9Aɥ锁ȁAͥ́ݥȁ)ձMݥˊe)хѥ́Ʌє)յЁ͍ɥ-ٔЁ]܁A-)ɑ)ɕեɕ͍ɥѡ)ٔɥ-ݽɭYȁAѠ͍ɥѥ)Hɥ<<ȁ<ݸ)5չЁՉɸQє)ɑа)ȸЁ́ѱ)ݥѠȁɥ̸ܰ)ɑ݅́ ѕQѕ)ɽЁչѥа)!ɅQѕչѥ́Ѡ)!ѡЁɕѽȁ)QQѕ́I͕مѥ́(쁑ɥ̀啅ȁѕɔ)5͕ͅϊdɝ)Ёݹȁ͕مѥ))ɑɽ՝ЁAɕͥ)ɥ́ Ѽ)5չЁՉɸ(MݕЁՉɸ+qɑͅa5չЁՉɸ ѕ䁥́ȁ)܁ɕͥгgtɕ́ qɑݡݽձ$݅ЁѼ)ݽɬЁѕt$ͭsa] ٔ)5չЁՉɸ́ЁЁѕ今d$́ѡͅ)ѡɕЁ́ѽ今t+qɑչѽѡЁ́ѡ ѕéم)͡ЁݽձٔѼݥ͍́Ʌѥ̳t)́ͅ q!́ͥ唁ɸȁѡ͍)݅́مՅ́ݔٕѡ܁ѕ)ѡЁݽձѡх5չЁՉɸͥѼ)ѥٔѕ丁!݅́ѡəЁQѕPɥ)ͥЁɝѼȁ͍̻ͥ