State of Caring Carers UK State of Caring 2017 Report - Page 8

STATE OF CARING REPORT 2017 Support from GPs Over two-thirds 68 % In the last three years, the numbers of carers identified by GP practices has fallen, despite the promotion of good practice in some areas. ii Funding is not always consistent for promotion work and local improvements are not always sustained. On the one hand, the NHS often expects family to support other members, but on the other hand can fail to equip them with the knowledge and expertise to do so, and does not consistently recognise or support them. said that their GP knows they are a carer but that they don’t do anything different as a result When asked if their GP knows they are a carer, disappointingly, over two thirds of carers (68%) said that their GP knows but that they don’t do anything different as a result. This rises to 73% for those who are providing over 50 hours of care a week, and 75% for those providing care for a disabled child. I have suffered physical problems because of my caring role, mainly back and hands due to pushing a wheelchair, lifting and supporting my wife Only 9% of all respondents currently providing care said that their GP knows and offers them extra support with their caring role and 8% said their GP knows they are a carer and provides some help but could do more to support them. 15% of people currently providing care said their GP does not know they are a carer. This rises to 2 out of 10 (20%) for those who are providing care whilst bringing up a child without disabilities and to one quarter (25%) for those who are in paid work whilst providing care. Mental health is a big problem. The isolation is the hardest and the lack of understanding of my son’s autism These results highlight the need to introduce a new duty on the NHS to put in place policies to identify carers and to promote their health and wellbeing. eel What would make the most difference to health and wellbeing? Respondents were asked what would make the most difference to improving their health and wellbeing. Regular breaks from caring was the most popular choice, with 2 in 5 (42%) placing access to breaks in their top three things. This was followed by good quality care services for the person they care for (35%) and a better income (32%). 08