Serve Magazine from Concordia Plan Services Winter 2017 - Page 15

Pulse Points

Investing for the Now and Later

BY Steve Gruenwald , Director of Worker Wellness

Investing , planning , reaping benefits — these sound like terms describing sound financial health in retirement . They are , but they ’ re also the terms used to describe good physical health going into retirement .

Planning financially for your retirement and having good health in retirement are clearly linked . The problem is that many people aren ’ t paying attention to either their health or their wealth as they work toward their retirement years . To compound the issue , poor health can reduce retirement savings because of increased medical expenses and can possibly reduce earnings if you ’ re forced to stop working early .
The research is clear on the importance of caring for your health now for a healthier retirement later :
• A Fidelity study of people aged 55-64 found that people in poor physical health may need 20 percent more in annual retirement income than those in good health .
• According to Money magazine , people aged 45-64 who eat better , maintain a healthy weight and exercise a few hours a week can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by 35 percent , thus reducing the cost of cardiovascular disease treatment .
• A 25-year study of 5,900 men and women by the University of Pittsburgh Center for Aging and Population Health found that people aged 65 and older
$ 6,000 $ 5,000 $ 4,000 $ 3,000
Average Annual Healthcare Costs for Individuals on Medicare
Age 65
Age 70 Age 75 Excellent Health Moderate Health Poor Health
Estimates provided by Healthview , June 2011
who have “ the highest level of health habits ” could expect to live 80 percent of their remaining years disability-free . In contrast , those with “ the lowest level of health habits ” could expect to live only 55-60 percent of their remaining years disability-free .
• Finally , according to the Insured Retirement Institute , a 65-year-old male in excellent health can expect to live to age 87 , but only 81 if in poor health . A 65-year-old female in excellent health has a life expectancy of 89 , but only 84 if in poor health .
Keep in mind , however , living longer due to healthy living isn ’ t a given . You don ’ t know how long you have on this earth before God calls you home . Besides , it ’ s not just about living longer . It ’ s about continuing to serve your church , your family and your community during those retirement years .
Investing in your health at any age is important to helping you carry out your ministry and service to others . Any improvements in your healthy behaviors now will have lasting financial and physical benefits later , and that financial and physical stability will ultimately enable you to serve others well into your retirement years .
ConcordiaPlans . org | Serve 15
Pulse Points Investing for the Now and Later BY Steve Gruenwald, Director of Worker Wellness I nvesting, planning, reaping benefits — these sound like terms describing sound financial health in retirement. They are, but they’re also the terms used to describe good physical health going into retirement. Planning financially for your retirement and having good health in retire- ment are clearly linked. The problem is that many people aren’t paying attention to either their health or their wealth as they work toward their retirement years. To compound the issue, poor health can reduce retirement savings because of increased medical expenses and can possibly reduce earnings if you’re forced to stop working early. The research is clear on the importance of caring for your health now for a healthier retirement later: • A Fidelity study of people aged 55-64 found that people in poor physical Average Annual Healthcare Costs for health may need 20 percent more in Individuals on Medicare annual retirement income than those in good health. $6,000 • According to Money magazine, people $5,000 aged 45-64 who eat better, maintain a healthy weight and exercise a few $4,000 hours a week can reduce the risk of $3,000 cardiovascular disease by 3RW&6VBvRsvRsPvRcPFW2&VGV6rFR67Bb6&Ff67V F6V6RG&VFVBW6VVBVFFW&FRVF"VF( #RזV"7GVGbRÓV@vV'FRVfW'6GbGG6'W&vW7FFW2&fFVB'VFfWrVR#6VFW"f"vrBVFVFfVBFBVRvVBcRBFW vfR( FRvW7BWfVbVF&G>( 6VBWV7BFƗfRW&6VBbFV"&VrV'0F6&ƗGg&VR6G&7BF6RvF( FRvW7BWfVbVF&G>( 6VBWV7BFƗfRǒSRcW&6VBbFV"&VrV'2F6&ƗGg&VR( fǒ66&FrFFR7W&VB&WF&VVB7FGWFRcRזV"BRW6VVBVF6WV7BFƗfRFvRr'WBǒb"VFcRזV"BfVRW6VVBVF2ƖfRWV7F7b'WBǒBb"VFशVW֖BvWfW"ƗfrvW"GVRFVFƗfr6( BvfVRF( BrrpRfRF2V'F&Vf&RvB62RR&W6FW2N( 2BW7B&WBƗfrvW"N( 2&W@6FVrF6W'fRW"6W&6W"f֖ǒBW"6VGGW&rF6R&WF&VVBV'2खfW7FrW"VFBvR2'FBFVrR6''WBW"֖7G'B6W'f6RFFW'2&fVVG2W"VF&Vf'2rvfR7Frf6B66&VRЦfG2FW"BFBf6B667F&ƗGvVFFVǒV&RRF6W'fRFW'2vVFW &WF&VVBV'266&F2&p6W'fRP