Radiation Protection Today Winter 2021 - Page 32

Latest from Legs and Regs

Legislation for Non-Ionising Radiation We are familiar with the recent changes regarding Ionising Radiations Regulations . Here are two significant recent developments for non-ionising radiation :
• The publication of new radiofrequency ( RF ) guidelines by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection ( ICNIRP ), namely ‘ Guidelines for limiting exposure to electromagnetic fields ( 100 kHz to 300 GHz )’. The publication replaces and supersedes the 100 kHz to 300 GHz part of the ICNIRP ( 1998 ) radiofrequency guidelines and covers relatively new applications such as 5G technologies , Wi-Fi , Bluetooth , mobile phones , and base stations . More information can be found at https :// www . icnirp . org / en / activities / news / news-article / rf-guidelines-2020- published . html .
• Ofcom now requires radiocommunications licence holders to protect the general public from exposure to electromagnetic fields . Effectively , there is now a requirement for organisations to comply with recognised limits on EMF exposure . More details can be found at https :// www . ofcom . org . uk / manage-yourlicence / emf / policy .
ARSAC online portal improvements The Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee ( ARSAC ) advises the licensing authorities on applications from practitioners , employers and researchers who want to use radioactive substances on people . Following the successful launch of the ARSAC online portal in September 2020 , further improvements have been made to allow practitioners to submit new and amendment applications through the portal , monitor progress of all their applications , and share access to their submissions . More developments are planned , including online submission of employer licence applications .
Legislation Quick Guide Ionising Radiation ( Medical Exposure ) Regulations – IR ( ME ) R
Background Ionising radiation is used widely in the medical sector in hospitals , dental care , clinics and in medical research to help diagnose and treat conditions . Examples are x-rays and nuclear medicine scans , and treatments such as radiotherapy .
What is the aim of IR ( ME ) R ? Making sure that radiation is used safely to protect patients from the risk of harm when being exposed to ionising radiation . They set out the responsibilities of duty holders ( the employer , referrer , IR ( ME ) R practitioner and operator ) for radiation protection and the basic safety standards that they must meet :
· minimising unintended , excessive or incorrect medical exposures
· clinically justifying each exposure to ensure the benefits outweigh the risks
· optimising diagnostic doses to keep them “ as low as reasonably practicable ” for their intended use
Only registered healthcare professionals can request ionising radiation exposures and justify them . Only authorised operators may carry out exposures .
Who is the regulator ? England : The Care Quality Commission ; Scotland : Healthcare Improvement Scotland ; Northern Ireland : The Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority ; Wales : Healthcare Inspectorate Wales
Who needs to comply with IR ( ME ) R ? The regulations apply to both the independent sector and the public sector .
Where can I find more information ? The Ionising Radiation ( Medical Exposure ) Regulations are at www . legislation . gov . uk England , Wales and Scotland : IR ( ME ) R 2017 and IR ( ME ) R ( Amendment ) 2018 Northern Ireland : IR ( ME ) R 2017
32 Radiation Protection Today www . srp-rpt . uk