Pulse September 2020 - Page 45

“We’ve zoned our spa so that there is less travel throughout the spa. We’re using different areas for prep. Our concierge is split into different zones to keep them separated as well.” — CERISE BONNER, Hospitality & Retail Director, The Woodhouse Day Spa Northern Kentucky many spas, both the Lexington and Northern Kentucky Woodhouse locations have closed their duet (couples’) room, but the spas’ quiet rooms remain open—albeit only to guests receiving multiple treatments. Guests who are receiving a single treatment are escorted directly to their treatment room by the service provider and change in the room, rather than the changing room (also available only to multiple-service guests). The decision to keep this area open for some guests was motivated by a desire to preserve some element of the normal guest experience for the spas’ most engaged clients. To avoid a single potential COVID-19 exposure from forcing the entire spa staff to quarantine, both locations have “zoned” their spaces and staffs. “We’ve zoned our spa so that there is less travel throughout the spa,” Bonner says. “We’re using different areas for prep. Our concierge is split into different zones to keep them separated as well.” Bonner and her team have also mapped out their retail area for six-foot social distancing to max out capacity while remaining safe, and the spas’ small nail salons feature dividers between stations. “We only have two nail technicians performing services at a time, and we had to separate their implements differently. They used to be able to share them.” Temperature checks are required for employees and guests, as are masks. To prep her team for all of these changes, Bonner implemented training via Zoom, initially, and developed scripts with new verbiage to reflect both the spas’ protocol changes and the reduced availability of amenities. “Our prices did not change, so we needed to communicate that script to guests,” Bonner adds. Eventually, the team was brought in for extensive training and roleplaying to practice new guidelines, particularly around mask-wearing. By the time that the phase-two employees were brought back, the first wave of employees was already comfortable enough to help integrate the newly returning staff. Bonner also eased in second-wave staff by allowing them the full 30-minute sanitation window between treatments, while first-wave staff had managed to reduce their windows to 15 minutes. SEPTEMBER 2020 ■ PULSE 33