Pulse January 2023 - Page 36

MEMBER PERSPECTIVES

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decisions .“ I try to involve them as much as possible in the things that will affect our day-to-day ,” she says .“ They ’ re the ones on the front lines , so if it ’ s something that affects their jobs , I ’ m not afraid to take risks if they want to try something new — if it doesn ’ t work , we pivot and try something else .” Jaleesa also notes a side benefit of soliciting employees ’ ideas : “ It helps me , too . I don ’ t have to think so hard .”
Ginger looks to her specialist staff to provide hands-on research .“ When we look at bringing in a new product line , they ’ re involved , they review product samples , they point out gaps in our menu of products and services . If they ’ re not in support of anything we ’ re rolling out , it makes it difficult for guests to enjoy .” She is quick to note , however , “ Voices are heard and recognized , but of course not every decision can be what every team member asked for . But we keep all ideas in discussion in case their time is right in the future .”
At her spa , Tammy provides forms to her staff to seek their direct input .“ We ask three questions : How can we improve our culture ? and What do you love about your job ? and Anything else ?”
EXTERNAL INFLUENCE Staff members are often the literal face of a spa — they are the ones who engage directly with clients . The fifth rule of employee engagement is to allow them to influence external relationships and brand development . At the spa , that means bringing team members into discussions about interacting with clients and vendors .
“ We are where we are because of the wonderful employees we have ,” Tammy believes .“ Our staff of 45 all bring unique qualities to the table .” At staff meetings , Tammy asks her team for suggestions about upcoming seasons and events , then uses their comments to help shape marketing and communications .
Ginger likes to recognize her staff ’ s role in client relationships .“ Amplifying the guest experience really comes from the team members ,” she says . Ginger also notes ,“ We have an entrepreneurial mindset to be creative within brand standards ,” and that her spa uses a “ Culture Club ” of team members who are invited to make decisions on different aspects of the organization ’ s brand and culture .
Nancy points to her spa leadership ’ s efforts to involve employees in retail product lines — and the sometimes unexpected results .“ Our massage therapists asked for us to bring in a couple of specific high-end products and I was skeptical — prior product sales from that team didn ’ t seem to justify it ,” she recalls .“ But I believed in them and now we can ’ t keep the product on the shelf . They were inspired to sell .”
A yearly employee engagement survey that leads to an action planning progress is a key way for Jaleesa ’ s employees to affect her spa ’ s external relationships .“ We use the Breakthrough Leadership process that has weekly WIGs — wildly important goals — to enhance the product and service we ’ re providing . These weekly goals make our customers happier , and that makes our surveys better .” n

“ Amplifying the guest experience really comes from the team members .”

FEATURED SOURCES
— GINGER MCLEAN , director of spa operations at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino - Rock Spa & Salon
JALEESA HONRADE Director of Spa and Recreation VINOY RENAISSANCE RESORT AND GOLF CLUB
NANCY KING Director of Spa and Retail SPA RITUAL AT SYCUAN
GINGER McLEAN Director of Spa Operations HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO – ROCK SPA & SALON
TAMMY SCHNEIDER
Owner
ZI SPA & SALON
34 PULSE n JANUARY 2023