Professional Sound - August 2017 - Page 36

his new space and just ahead of the opening day of the 38 th edition of the Montreal International Jazz Festival .
When it came to the acoustic treatments for the seven rehearsal studios and his recording suite , Chambers consulted several studio designers in his contact list about things like floating floors , soundproofing principles , baffle and diffuser design , and so on . Of course , he also carried forward a fair share of experience from the construction of his previous two facilities .
The substantial work required on the design and acoustics front kept him close by during the construction process to the point that , for a few months , he wasn ’ t taking on any recording or outside work . “ It ’ s not an easy task ,” he emphasizes . “ If one nail goes in the wrong place , it could compromise the whole design .”
All of the rooms feature floating floor designs and the same basic acoustic treatment , though as Chambers attests , the rooms each have their own sonic character owing to their different dimensions .
Studio A is a 24 x 24-ft . space with 13-ft . ceilings that offers a good aural balance between live and controlled response .
Studios B and C have higher ceilings but are also more narrow , giving them a very airy and open quality . “ They ’ re a little more live than our others ,” Chambers explains , “ but I did want a couple [ of rooms ] that had a bit more reflection and could breathe a bit more .”
“ I ’ m just using technology that ’ s out there to maximize people ’ s productivity , and give them a space where they can not only rehearse , but do several things under one roof .”
studio right next to a hard rock band in another , and as Chambers says , “ Both can work in harmony with no problem whatsoever .”
He continues : “ I didn ’ t want this to be like anything else in Canada . Every stage I would see at the summer festivals while the new facility was being built , I was noticing the technology they were using – like engineers mixing monitors on a tablet from the stage .” So while the individual studios at Base Bin all boast pristine acoustic treatment , they also feature state-of-the-art technologies , like a Behringer tablet-controlled XR18 or X32 digital mixing console in each . Other companies like Yamaha Canada Music and PAG Canada , which represents Electro-Voice across the country , also stepped up with support .
“ It ’ s absolutely amazing ,” Chambers enthuses . “ I can walk into a really complicated set-up with a certain artist , and once we ’ ve done it one time , I can save the scene and the band can walk in the next time , we place the mics where they were , and I leave . That makes it so efficient for the client , and so efficient for me , since I have several rooms to deal with .”
Chambers says these last few months of operation are the first time in his 20-year career that people have come out of the studio and actually gushed about their experiences . “ It ’ s not just rehearsal [ to them ]; with the technology and the proper gear and the rooms properly treated , they ’ re leaving the room like , ‘ What just happened ?’ These are artists that have rehearsed and performed in every type of space for decades and they ’ re admitting they just haven ’ t had an experience like this . As much as I ’ d like to toot my own horn after close to 20 years in the previous space , I ’ ve never had this kind of reception . I ’ m blown away and couldn ’ t be happier .”
LOUNGE
Conversely , Studios D , E , and F – lovingly dubbed the “ mini Base Bins ” because of their smaller dimensions and lower 13-ft . ceilings – are “ very tight-sounding ,” according to Chambers , in part because of the heavier acoustic treatments compared to the other spaces . These smaller rooms are ideal for five musicians or fewer .
Then , there ’ s Studio G . Of the seven rehearsal studios , this is the crown jewel – a 1,000 sq . ft . space with 20 ft . ceilings and simple but elegant décor . It offers the best of both worlds in terms of its sonic character – open and airy but with plenty of control . This is the space that ’ s been attracting the big names back to the new Studio Base Bin .
“ The bulk of my A-list clientele , a lot of them have already been back here ,” Chambers says . “ It ’ s really cool to see some of the bigger production companies welcoming me back after being closed , too . This is now the hub that brings together so many things that I love about my work with music .”
On any given day , you might find a jazz trio rehearsing in one
CONCEPTION TO PRODUCTION
Plenty of new songs have surely already been born inside Studio Base Bin ’ s various rehearsal rooms , and being the musical hub that it is , musicians can professionally record those very tracks under the same roof .
Chambers doesn ’ t publicly advertise as a commercial studio ; he doesn ’ t really have to . After decades in the music business , his professional network is substantial , and enough people seem to know that they can have Chambers cut their tracks at Studio Base Bin or take advantage of the space with an outside engineer .
“ I designed it to be more comfortable and practical for songwriting and one-on-one sessions , or even having several people in the room collaborating ,” Chambers says of his new recording space compared to its predecessor .
The control room is spartan and spacious with a very modern and sleek aesthetic . There ’ s a small iso booth connected to it that can fit a full drum kit , though it ’ s primarily used for vocal or guitar tracking . There ’ s also an isolated amp booth accessible from the main control area .
36 PROFESSIONAL SOUND
his new space and just ahead of the opening day of the 38 th edi- tion of the Montreal International Jazz Festival. When it came to the acoustic treatments for the seven re- hearsal studios and his recording suite, Chambers consulted sev- eral studio designers in his contact list about things like floating floors, soundproofing principles, baffle and diffuser design, and so on. Of course, he also carried forward a fair share of experience from the construction of his previous two facilities. The substantial work required on the design and acoustics front kept him close by during the construction process to the point that, for a few months, he wasn’t taking on any recording or outside work. “It’s not an easy task,” he emphasizes. “If one nail goes in the wrong place, it could compromise the whole design.” All of the rooms feature floating floor designs and the same basic acoustic treatment, though as Chambers attests, the rooms each have their own sonic character owing to their different dimensions. Studio A is a 24 x 24-ft. space with 13-ft. ceilings that offers a good aural balance between live and controlled response. Studios B and C have higher ceilings but are also more nar- row, giving them a very airy and open quality. “They’re a little more live than our others,” Chambers explains, “but I did want a couple [of rooms] that had a bit more reflection and could breathe a bit more.” LOUNGE Conversely, Studios D, E, and F – lovingly dubbed the “mini Base Bins” because of their smaller dimensions and lower 13-ft. ceilings – are “very tight-sounding,” according to Chambers, in part because of the heavier acoustic treatments compared to the other spaces. These smaller rooms are ideal for five musicians or fewer. Then, there’s Studio G. Of the seven rehearsal studios, this is the crown jewel – a 1,000 sq. ft. space with 20 ft. ceilings and sim- ple but elegant décor. It offers the best of both worlds in terms of its sonic character – open and airy but with plenty of control. This is the space that’s been attracting the big names back to the new Studio Base Bin. “The bulk of my A-list clientele, a lot of them have already been back here,” Chambers says. “It’s really cool to see some of the bigger production companies welcoming me back after being closed, too. This is now the hub that brings together so many things that I love about my work with music.” On any given day, you might find a jazz trio rehearsing in one 36 PROFESSIONAL SOUND “I’m just using technology that’s out there to maximize people’s productivity, and give them a space where they can not only rehearse, but do several things under one roof.” studio right next to a hard rock band in another, and as Chambers says, “Both can work in harmony with no problem whatsoever.” He continues: “I didn’t want this to be like anything else in Can- ada. Every stage I would see at the summer festivals while the new facility was being built, I was noticing the technology they were using – like engineers mixing monitors on a tablet from the stage.” So while the individual studios at Base Bin all boast pristine acoustic treatment, they also feature state-of-the-art technologies, like a Behringer tablet-controlled XR18 or X32 digital mixing con- sole in each. Other companies like Yamaha Canada Music and PAG Canada, which represents Electro-Voice across the country, also stepped up with support. “It’s absolutely amazing,” Chambers enthuses. “I can walk into a really complicated set-up with a certain artist, and once we’ve done it one time, I can save the scene and the band can walk in the next time, we p XHHZX\H^H\K[HX]K]XZ\]YXY[܈HY[ [YXY[܈YK[HH]H]\[\X[] 'B[X\^\\H\][۝و\][ۈ\HB\[YH[\ ^YX\\Y\][H]HYH]وBY[[XX[H\YX]Z\^\Y[\ˈ8']8&\\ZX\[[WN]HXH[H\X\[H\\HX]Y ^x&\HX][HHZK8&]\\[Y&H\H\H\\]]HZX\Y[\ܛYY[]\H\HوXH܈XY\[^x&\HYZ][^H\KB[&]Y[^\Y[HZH\ˈ\]X\x&YZH^HۂܛY\H YX\[H][\XKx&]H]\Y\š[وX\[ۋx&[Hۈ]^H[[&]H\Y\'BӐTSӈPSӂ[Hو]ۙ]H\[H[XYHY[ܛ[YHY[\H[&\\[\ZX\[\[Z[H]\X[X]]\]\XX[[ٙ\[ۘ[HXܙH\HX[\B[YHً[X\\۸&]XXHY\\H\H[Y\X[Y[B\۸&]X[H]HˈY\XY\[H]\X\[\\B\[ۘ[]ܚ\X[X[ [[Y[HY[Hۛ]^H[]H[X\]Z\X]Y[\H[܂ZHY[YHوHXH][]YH[[Y\'H\YۙY]H[ܙHYܝXH[XX[܈ۙBܚ][[ۙK[ۋ[ۙH\[ۜ܈][][]\[[H[HHXܘ][8'H[X\^\و\]Xܙ[XB\\Y]YX\܋H۝H\\[[X[\]H\H[\[YZY\]Xˈ\x&\HX[\ۛXY]][]H[[H] Y]8&\[X\[H\Y܈[܈Z]\X[ˈ\x&\[[\]Y[\X\XHHBXZ[۝\XK