Professional Sound - August 2017 - Page 35

STUDIO G former colleagues at Steve ’ s Music , who Chambers says “ really believed in what [ he ] was doing .” That ’ s largely because there wasn ’ t really anything like what he was proposing in the area . “ The mindset in Montreal at the time seemed to be that if you put really good equipment in these studios , it was going to get wrecked ,”
Chambers offers . “ But to me , it was , if you want a pro clientele , you have to have pro-level gear , and up-and-comers would be thrilled to play on that kind of gear , so I knew I could find a balance .” And that ’ s exactly what he did . Studio Base Bin made a big impression off the bat , with the city ’ s music community embracing the business and its founder , who many recognized from his time at Steve ’ s and his live performances .
After a few years , Base Bin moved to its second location , still in the same area of the Plateau , and enjoyed a successful run nearly two decades long .
“ During that time , I was still playing live from time to time with [ popular pop-rock band ] Sky , when Karl Wolf was the lead singer there , and then starting playing with Karl solo while still running the studios ,” Chambers recalls ; however , the studios were soon taking up so much of his time that he had to put performing live on ice for some time .
“ We had a great run there on Saint Laurent with so many big names coming through ,” he enthuses , listing off the likes of Queen Latifah , Chromeo , The Barr Brothers , and film actor Gary Sinise as repeat clients .
In addition to the rehearsal studios , Chambers was also operating a recording studio out of the space and collaborating with plenty of artists as a songwriter , producer , and engineer . The list
STUDIO BASE BIN
4275 Frontenac Montreal , QC H2H 2M4 514-281-1547 www . studiobasebin . com of acts with whom he ’ s worked on those fronts is diverse and impressive , including the likes of Simple Plan , Dream Theater , Debbie Gibson , Moist , and many others .
In fact , his latest collaborations with jazz vocalist Coral Egan earned a JUNO nomination , which came just before he shut down Studio Base Bin ’ s Saint Laurent location and contemplated his next move .
OUT IN FRONTENAC
In what was essentially an empty warehouse on Frontenac Street in the Delorimier neighbourhood showing its barest bones , Chambers saw the future of his business . He shared his plans with a friend that helped him mock up a rough idea of the layout , “ and even then , we came up with a great facility ,” he enthuses . “ Seven fully-equipped rehearsal studios plus my recording control room , a conference room , a mezzanine for a video editing suite …” There ’ s even a small boutique in partnership with local instrument retailer Musique Max .
The conversion process lasted about two years – a long time for Chambers , considering his livelihood was basically on the line . “ It was a long process with a lot of red tape and a lot of stop-and-go ,” he recalls , enjoying the benefit of now being on the other side of it all . “ At one time , we were thinking it might not happen , and it stayed like that until the walls started going up .”
Subsequently , the final six months of the makeover sped right along . That ’ s in large part due to the contributions of many who believed in the business , including film and TV composer Ray Fabi , Tom Cronin , Chambers ’ business partner Michael Battista , and Zach Tahi , who funded and contracted the build .
Chambers had his sights set on reopening in the spring of 2017 , just ahead of summer festival season in Montreal . “ It ’ s kind of my Christmas , this time of
RECORDING CONTROL ROOM year ,” he says , speaking to Professional Sound after a few months of operation in
PROFESSIONAL SOUND 35
STUDIO G former colleagues at Steve’s Music, who Chambers says “really believed in what [he] was doing.” That’s largely because there wasn’t really anything like what he was proposing in the area. “The mind- set in Montreal at the time seemed to be that if you put really good equipment in these studios, it was going to get wrecked,” Chambers offers. “But to me, it was, if you want a pro clientele, you have to have pro-level gear, and up-and-comers would be thrilled to play on that kind of gear, so I knew I could find a balance.” And that’s exactly what he did. Studio Base Bin made a big impression off the bat, with the city’s music community embracing the busi- ness and its founder, who many recognized from his time at Steve’s and his live performances. After a few years, Base Bin moved to its second location, still in the same area of the Plateau, and enjoyed a successful run nearly two decades long. “During that time, I was still playing live from time to time with [popular pop-rock band] Sky, when Karl Wolf was the lead singer there, and then starting playing with Karl solo while still running the studios,” Chambers recalls; however, the studios were soon taking up so much of his time that he had to put performing live on ice for some time. “We had a great run there on Saint Laurent with s 䁉)́ѡɽ՝tѡ͕̰ѥѡ́EՕ)1ѥ ɽQ ȁ ɽѡ̰ѽȁM͔)ɕЁ̸)%ѥѼѡɕͅՑ̰ ́݅́ͼȴ)ѥɕɑՑЁѡɅѥݥѠ)䁽ѥ́́ͽɥѕȰɽՍȰȸQ)MQU%< M %8(ԁɽѕ)5ɕE 4(дĴ)ܹՑ͕)́ݥѠݡéݽɭѡ͔ɽٕ͔́́)ɕͥٔՑѡ́MAɕQѕȰ)ͽ5а䁽ѡ̸)%а́ѕЁɅѥ́ݥѠٽЁ Ʌ)ɹ)U9<ѥݡЁɔ͡Ёݸ)MՑ ͔ éMЁ1ɕЁѥѕѕ)Ёٔ)=UP%8I=9Q9 )%ݡЁ͕݅́ѥ䁅݅ɕ͔ɽѕMɕ)ѡɥȁɡ͡ݥ́ɕЁ̰) ́ͅ܁ѡɔ̸́ͥ!͡ɕ́)ݥѠɥѡЁɽ՝ѡа+qٕѡݔݥѠɕЁ䳊tѡ̸͕+qMٕձ䵕եɕͅՑ́́ɕɑɽ)ɽɕɽ酹ȁ٥ѥեїt)Qɗéٕ͵ѥՔѹ͡ݥѠյ)ɕхȁ5ͥՔ5)Qٕͥɽ́ѕ)ݼ啅̃Lѥȁ ̰)ͥɥٕ́݅́ͥ)ѡq%Ё݅́ɽ́ݥѠ)ЁɕхЁѽt)ɕ̰她ѡЁ)ѡѡȁͥЁqЁ)ѥݔݕɔѡЁЁЁ)Ёх啐ѡЁչѥѡ݅)хѕt)MՉ͕Օѱ䰁ѡͥѡ)ѡٕȁɥЁQӊe)ɝЁՔѼѡɥѥ)ݡٕѡ̰ͥ)ՑQX͕ȁI)Q ɽ ϊdͥ́ѹ)5 ѥфiQݡ)չɅѕѡե) ͕́́ͥ́Ёɔ)ѡɥܰЁ)յȁѥم͕ͽ5ɕ+q%ӊé ɥѵ̰ѡ́ѥ)啅ȳt̰ͅѼAɽͥ)I =I%9 =9QI=0I==4)Mչѕȁ܁ѡ́Ʌѥ)AI=MM%=90M=U9