Lab Matters Winter 2018 - Page 26

environmental health New Jersey Uses Biomonitoring and Environmental Data to Assess Intervention Effectiveness By: Chang Ho Yu, Research Scientist 3, Environmental and Chemical Laboratory Services, Public Health and Environmental Laboratories, New Jersey Department of Health and Zhihua (Tina) Fan, program manager, Environmental and Chemical Laboratory Services, Public Health and Environmental Laboratories, New Jersey Department of Health In 2012, elevated perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), within the class of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), was detected in public water systems and private wells in Paulsboro and West Deptford communities in New Jersey. PFNA is very stable in the environment and can be bioaccumulated in the human body once absorbed through ingestion. It may lead to adverse health effects, such as liver and immune system impacts, elevated cholesterol levels, and delayed growth and development of fetuses and infants. Beginning in 2014, interventions were carried out intermittently by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) in these communities, and granular-activated charcoal (GAC) filters were installed in public water systems and private wells. However, the communities expressed serious concerns about their exposure to PFNA and the effectiveness of the interventions. To respond to these concerns, the Public Health and Environmental Laboratories, New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH), partnered with Environmental Table. Analytes meas ured in serum, water, and dust matrices by the NJDOH PFAS community exposure study. Analytes in Water/Dust Analytes in Serum Chemical Name Chemical Formula CAS Number PFBS PFBuS Perfluorobutanesulfonic acid C 4 HF 9 O 3 S 375-73-5 PFHxS PFHxS Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid C 6 HF 13 O 3 S 355-46-4 PFOS PFOS Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid C 8 HF 17 O 3 S 1763-23-1 PFHxA - Perfluorohexanoic acid C 6 HF 11 O 2 307-24-4 PFHpA PFHpA Perfluoroheptanoic acid C 7 HF 13 O 2 375-85-9 PFOA PFOA Perfluorooctanoic acid C 8 HF 15 O 2 335-67-1 PFNA PFNA Perfluorononanoic acid C 9 HF 17 O 2 375-95-1 PFDA PFDeA Perfluorodecanoic acid C 10 HF 19 O 2 335-76-2 PFUnA PFUA Perfluoroundecanoic acid C 11 HF 21 O 2 2058-94-8 PFDoA PFDoA Perfluorododecanoic acid C 12 HF 23 O 2 307-55-1 PFTrDA — Perfluorotridecanoic acid C 13 HF 25 O 2 72629-94-8 PFTA — Perfluorotetradecanoic acid C 14 HF 27 O 2 376-06-7 — PFOSA Perfluorooctanesulfonamide C 8 H 2 F 17 NO 2 S 754-91-6 NMeFOSAA Me-PFOSA- AcOH N-methyl perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetic acid or 2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid C 11 H 6 F 17 NO 4 S 2355-31-9 NEtFOSAA Et-PFOSA- AcOH N-ethyl perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetic acid or 2-(N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid C 12 H 8 F 17 NO 4 S 2991-50-6 Note: PFHxA, PFTrDA and PFTA are measured by the EPA Method 537; PFOSA are measured by the CDC Method 6304.04. 24 LAB MATTERS Winter 2018 and Occupational Health and Sciences Institute (EOHSI) from Rutgers University, initiated an exposure study to monitor the change of PFNA in blood serum of local residents after interventions. This study aims to measure PFNA and 11 additional PFASs (listed in CDC Method 6304.04) in serum for three consecutive years, once per year, for a total of 100-200 volunteers between the ages of 20-74, from residents who have lived in the affected communities during the past three years. In the first year, drinking water and house dust will be measured for 14 PFASs listed in EPA Water Testing Method 537. Questionnaires will be administered to collect information on demographics and potential PFNA sources. The data will be used to evaluate whether the intervention is effective and to identify significant sources of PFNA exposure. In addition to the half-life of PFNA and PFNA in serum, the water ratio will be explored. The most challenging aspect of this project has been development of the outreach/recruitment plan. Since the project aims to address a top community issue which has generated public attention, extensive outreach and communication efforts were required, This study aims to measure PFNA and 11 additional PFASs (listed in CDC Method 6304.04) in serum for three consecutive years, once per year, for a total of 100-200 volunteers between the ages of 20-74, from residents who have lived in the affected communities during the past three years. PublicHealthLabs @APHL APHL.org