Kiawah Island Digest June 2018 - Page 3

3 June 2018 KICA Core Functions (Continued From Previous Page) of these bridges. Each time a bridge is repaired, deck timbers are replaced, and bolts are added to every timber. Hangers beneath the timbers tie the deck timbers together in 8-timber groupings. This reduces rattling and damage to the boards, substantially extending bridge life. Connor has led a similar evolution on KICA’s 25 boardwalks. Battered by 2015’s 1,000-year flood event and then 2016’s Hurricane Matthew, he investigated depth pilings. The result was a requirement that pilings being driven more deeply into the beach, to a depth of 10 feet. The depth must be verified by KICA’s structural engineering consultant before contractors can proceed to the next phase of construction. After 2017’s Tropical Storm Irma, many beachfront owners who lost boardwalks referred their contractors to the department for consultation about achieving a similar integrity. tag of $325,250, with $90,000 in pipe cost alone. But Connor’s use of spin-casting has saved KICA significant money and repair time, and has maintained pipe capacities on similar jobs. Connor describes the spin-casting process as “like an anthill gone crazy.” A cementitious material is spun at 9000 PSI and mixed with a strong adhesive. Using a centrifugal pump, the material, called Centricast, is slowly spun into the pipe where it then sticks, coating the interior surface. When dry, it becomes a new cement pipe without joints. This method is preferred for Kiawah’s larger pipes, typically 36, 48 and 54 inch diameters. Connor and Ellmer’s work isn’t limited to physical infrastructure; they also advance important processes. They’ve developed a construction coordinate file – a digital project using AutoCAD, the most commonly used engineering software, making all files digital for one single source of information. This provides quick access to data for a variety of uses. It has helped greatly in processing encroachment permits for driveways that cross KICA drainage lines, for example. Visit kica.us/pipe-repair-methods to see a presentation with photos and descriptions of some of these work processes. Road repairs are often directly related to the deterioration of the old metal pipes beneath them. About 90% of emergency road repairs in the past five years have been related to metal pipe failure. This year, after a change in the way KICA budgets for these repairs, a significant allocation was made for metal pipe replacement. While it’s difficult to determine a priority for repairs other than age, opportunistic repairs can prove helpful. When a pipe breaks, replacement can now be extended to adjacent pipes as well. While drainage and roads are big portions of what the department addresses, there is much more. Professional inspections also fall under their purview. For example, staff oversees the annu al inspection by coastal engineers of the 500- foot Bass Creek revetment on Ocean Course Drive. The inspection requires divers to check the structure below the waterline. The revetment protects the roadway from Bass Creek channel and, if it were to fail, the roadway could be lost. Seven timber bridges connect smaller islands to Kiawah’s main island. They were originally designed to present a rustic sound when driven over. The 90 degree angle of the original design rattles the timbers and hardware, causing wear and tear. Connor believes that regular inspection and maintenance is the best way to approach repairs. In this case, he initiated a radical shift in the maintenance General Maintenance and the Mechanic’s Shop Connor also manages the general maintenance department, supervised by David Buck with four employees under him. This crew is responsible for everything from redecking walk bridges, filling potholes, routine boardwalk and shower maintenance, to painting and repairing member mailboxes. They also take care of facility items like HVACs and lighting at Beachwalker Center, both security gates, The Sandcastle and KICA’s other facilities. The mechanic’s shop employs two full-time mechanics. Skilled in both small and large engines, they service KICA’s 28 vehicles, three jon boats, and the numerous mowers and other small engine equipment required to operate the Land and Lakes Department. Continued on Next Page...