Intelligent CXO Issue 14 - Page 53

INTELLIGENT SECTION

FINANCE SALES & MARKETING HR SOLUTIONS EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

Research highlights shortfalls in employee training

In its recent whitepaper report – Are we trained for work ? – research by enterprise LMS provider , Digits , revealed that many organisations may not be providing enough – or the right types of – regular training to their staff .

According to the findings , based on a poll of 1,001 British workers , onboarding or induction training for new starters has reportedly only been offered to around a quarter of employees ( 25 % of senior and middle managers and 23 % of nonmanagerial staff ).
While training in soft skills , such as teamwork , adaptability , flexibility , time management and problem-solving , has only been offered to under a third ( 29 %).
Looking at the survey results by organisational role , there appears to be a clear connection between seniority levels and the availability of training . People occupying senior management positions are the most likely to receive training relating to their professional development , such as technical skills ( offered to 49 %), digital skills ( 38 %), communication ( 36 %), upskilling ( 30 %) and reskilling ( 18 %).
Middle managers are the most likely to have been offered training related to their position within an organisation , such as management ( offered to 48 % of this group ), diversity and inclusion ( 34 %), mentoring ( 32 %) and compliance ( 30 %).
Non-managerial staff are the most likely to be required to complete mandatory training instigated by their employers . They are also the most likely to have been offered health and safety training ( 61 % compared to 44 % of senior managers and 50 % of middle managers ), although providing health and safety information and training is a legal requirement for all UK employers . Conversely , non-managerial staff are among the least likely employees to be offered digital skills ( 27 %) or reskilling ( 14 %) – both could help them acquire new skills and progress in their careers .
Access to training varies by industry
It ' s not just employers who influence the type of training that employees are likely to receive – the industry they work in has a big impact too . For example ,
NON-MANAGERIAL STAFF ARE AMONG THE LEAST LIKELY EMPLOYEES TO BE OFFERED DIGITAL SKILLS ( 27 %) OR RESKILLING ( 14 %). people working in healthcare and social assistance are more likely to be offered soft skills training than those working in IT and software ( offered to 33 % and 25 % of employees in those industries respectively ). While people working in hospitality and food services are more likely to be offered digital skills than retail workers ( 32 % compared to 22 %).
Upskilling and reskilling employees is one of the best ways that employers can fill any skills gaps to help future-proof their organisation . It appears that many industries , however , aren ’ t prioritising either yet . People working in retail , government and public administration and shipping and distribution are , statistically , the most likely to have access to upskilling training ( offered to 38 %, 37 % and 36 % of employees in those industries respectively ).
While workers in hospitality and food services and construction are the most likely to have access to reskilling training ( 21 % and 20 % respectively ). x
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