Intelligent CISO Issue 16 - Page 75

To reap the full benefits of connectivity within smart buildings it is important that all networks and devices are comprehensively accounted for and secured, as each device could be a potential entry point for attackers. www.intelligentciso.com | Issue 16 lighting power per square foot from 1.28 watts to 0.4 watts, which is an energy saving of 70%. This was as a result of the media powerhouse implementing smart technology to control lighting and sensor blinds, among other things. However, along with the many benefits smart buildings offer, the convergence between operational technology and IT systems required to support them also opens smart facilities up to an increased threat of hacking. If a hacker is able to gain access to a smart building it potentially presents a world of opportunities to the hacker. For instance, because these new smart technologies are connected to the building’s IT network they open up new entry paths into corporate networks. Attackers could use these new devices as new ways in to instal malware on the corporate network or recruit the devices into botnets or even launch ransomware attacks against the organisation. This ultimately means that security for every single Internet-enabled appliance, from lighting to refrigerators, must be forethought before they are introduced into smart buildings. Making security a priority While most people would not look at their lighting or sensor blinds as attractive targets for attackers, the fact that these appliances are connected up to corporate networks, which also connect to sensitive information, means they are. Research and experience have shown repeatedly, when things are connected to the Internet, they become a target for malicious hackers. As a result, it is imperative that smart building operators make security a priority. To reap the full benefits of connectivity within smart buildings it is important that all networks and devices are comprehensively accounted for and 75