HHE HOPE 2019 - Page 13

CHART 16 Number of medical graduates per 100,000 inhabitants: Years 2006–2016 2006 2016 Variation: Years 2006 - 2016 25 200% 192% 149% 20 150% 120% 113% 103% 15 100% 63% 10 33% 27% 71% 50% 33% 24% 7% 5 60% 50% 43% 73% 17% 6% 16% 11% 1% 0% -20% -50% ia pu bl ite -37% 0 CHART 17 Number of nurses graduated per 100,000 inhabitants: Years 2006–2016 2006 120 2016 Variation: Years 2006 - 2016 80% 75% 63% 100 60% 49% 80 24% 18% 20% 19% -4% 20% 15% 5% 60 40% 30% 28% 3% -7% -1% -7% -17% -11% -23% 40 5% -25% -24% 0% -20% -40% 20 -60% -80% 0 -68% Netherlands (39%), Poland (45%) and Finland (46%). The most relevant positive variations on the number of physicians working in hospital between 2006 and 2016 were registered in Switzerland (+49%), Germany (+34%) and Hungary (+32%). By contrast, this indicator registered negative variations in Poland (–2%) and Greece (–9%). In 2016, the average number of physicians and nurses graduated for every 100,000 inhabitants were respectively about 14 and 42 in the EU; however, the values across countries were quite different. The number of medical graduates per 100,000 inhabitants ranged from 9 in France and Greece to 24 and 22 in Ireland and Denmark, respectively (Chart 16). The number of nurses graduated per 100,000 inhabitants ranged from 15 and 16 in Luxembourg and the Czech Republic to 99 and 104 in Switzerland and Denmark (Chart 17). Compared with 2006, the number of medical 13 HHE 2019 | hospitalhealthcare.com graduates per 100,000 inhabitants in the EU registered an overall positive variation. The countries that registered the highest increases were Portugal (+109%), Belgium (+137%), Slovenia (+156%) and Latvia (+158%). Minor positive variations occurred in Germany (+11%), Sweden (+11%), Denmark (+12%) and Estonia (+13%). Decreases happened in Greece (–37%) and Austria (–16%). The number of nurses graduated per 100,000 inhabitants registered different trends across the EU. Major positive variations were registered in Belgium (+75%) and Switzerland (+63%), whereas minor positive variations were registered in Latvia (+3%) and Hungary (+5%). Negative variations ranged from –1% and –4% respectively in Poland and Austria, to –24% and –25% in Slovakia and Portugal. The most relevant decrease was registered in the Czech Republic (–68%) in the same years.