Ground Weather and Light - Page 12

4.0 PROCEDURES INVOLVED IN MAKING GROUND INSPECTIONS This section of the Guidance deals with the procedures involved in deciding whether ground conditions caused by the weather (as opposed to bad light or lightning, which are dealt with separately at the end of this Guidance) are dangerous or unreasonable. Following every interruption for weather or after every delayed start to a match, the umpires must inspect the ground conditions prior to any play taking place. There should never be any assumption about the conditions being suitable for play. 4.1 The Inspection Before allowing play, umpires must, in addition to considering the factors above (at paragraphs 3.2 and 3.3), conduct a careful inspection of the playing conditions affecting the whole of the playing area (including the area immediately beyond the boundary over which fielders may need to pass as they endeavour to field or catch the ball), which should be carried out no faster than at a reasonable walking pace (ie walk over the playing area including that immediately beyond the boundary). Where play is underway, the umpires should be vigilant and observant in looking for signs of dangerous or unreasonable conditions and consult between themselves as necessary. What they may have regarded as safe earlier may have become unsafe – and they need to react promptly. Each umpire should arrive at his own conclusions on whether the conditions are dangerous or unreasonable. The way in which the inspection is carried out can be decided by the umpires. They may walk together or separately, provided that each arrives at his own decision, taking into account the conditions in the whole playing area (including the area immediately beyond the boundary over which the fielders may need to pass as they endeavour to field or catch the ball). A systematic approach is however recommended, taking in all of the areas causing particular concern in the same order. This will allow umpires to draw comparisons at times when the ground is not fit on the first or subsequent occasion and to assess any improvement that has been made in the conditions in that same area since prior inspections. Whilst the focus of this Guidance is weather, such an approach to inspection may also identify other risks, such as broken glass, hidden objects, divots etc. 10 92018 ECB Ground Weather and Light.indd 12 15/03/2016 15:58