Golf Industry Central Autumn 2012 - Page 14

“It’s probably be a three-year cycle of extra renovation to break all that up and to ensure the course stays in great nick, but it is in terrific condition. “They (maintenance staff and volunteers) have done a great job in the recovery and it’s well worth a look.” “The only evidence of the flood is the driving range is still a little scarred as we complete the grow end of the range,” Cosier said. Infrastructure wise, the club had to replace offices in the maintenance building, which are located in lower lying areas of the facility. “There was a lot of capital expense needed to be ploughed back in at a time when the golf industry is not going forward. “Since the floods we have built our technical centre which is very hi-tech so the club has gone ahead in leaps in bounds in the last 12 months.” A year ago, the floods left The Brisbane Golf Club looking like a muddied fruit 12 The Golf Marketing Professionals www.golfindustrycentral.com.au and vegetable garden after produce from the Rocklea markets washed onto the fairways. Today, the golf course is at its picturesque best and looks extremely inviting. The club’s general manager Simon Parker said ground staff and volunteers had the golf course back in play three weeks after the floods. “ “ “We have had to do more aeration and coring in the last 12 months than we’d usually do and will probably have to do that for the next few years as well just to get that silt up beneath the top layer. “The only evidence of the flood is the driving range is still a little scarred as we complete the grow end of the range,” It was an amazing feat considering the club received damage to the tune of $700,000-plus. Currently, the club is putting the finishing touches to its flood mitigation plan. “Most of our damage was fixing up the machinery shed,” Parker said. “As part of the process we have got a disaster mitigation plan that swings into action at certain trigger points.