EnergySafe Magazine Summer 2018/19, issue 52 - Page 21

esv.vic.gov.au Question Answer Standard/Clause I'm doing some works for a pool installer and have two questions. Arm’s reach is defined as: AS/NZS 3000:2018 1. The new 2018 Wiring Rules say 'within arm’s reach' — is there a measurement or distance for arms reach? 2. Some of the pools being installed are fiberglass pools. Am I still required to earth the concrete edge beam and the fence and other fittings that are within arm’s reach? A zone extending from any point on a surface where persons usually stand or move about, to the limits that a person can reach with the hand in any direction without assistance (e.g. tools or ladder). 1.4.16 Figure 1.1 In relation to a swimming pool this is measured on a horizontal plane 1.25m from the edge of the water. Figure 5.6 An equipotential bonding conductor shall be connected between the conductive pool structure and the pool equipotential bonding conductor connection point. 5.6.3 5.6.2.6 An equipotential bonding conductor shall also be connected to items of electrical equipment and conductive fixtures and fittings. The equipotential bonding conductor shall be connected to earthing conductors associated with each circuit supplying the pool or spa, or the earthing bar at the switchboard at which the circuits originate. I have been asked to install a circuit to an isolator for a split system air conditioner in a domestic home. Yes. In a domestic and residential installation additional protection by RCDs with a maximum rated residual current of 30 mA shall be provided for all final sub-circuits. AS/NZS 3000:2018 1. Yes. Where the circuit protection on a switchboard in domestic or residential situation is replaced, additional protection by RCDs with a maximum rated residual current of 30 mA shall be provided for all final sub-circuits. 2. In a non-domestic or non-residential setting, where circuit protection on a switchboard is replaced, additional protection by RCDs with a maximum rated residual current of 30 mA shall be provided for final sub-circuits with a rating not exceeding 32 A, supplying: » socket-outlets » lighting » direct connected hand-held electrical equipment e.g. directly connected tools » direct connected electrical equipment that represents an increased risk of electrical shock. AS/NZS 3000:2018 Yes. The roof top isolator’s function provides the ability to easily de-energise the cable from the panels to the inverter at the source of supply. The isolator at the inverter is to enable the inverter to be de-energised so it can be worked on safely. If the isolator is a long way from the panels, then you have a section of cable that is not able to be isolated easily. AS/NZS 5033 2.6.3.2.2 Do I need to put this circuit on an RCD? I am replacing and upgrading a switchboard at a residential home. 1. Do I need to put RCDs on all of the circuits, including the oven and electric hot water service? 2. Is this the same if the switchboard is for a factory or other non- residential installation? Do I need a D.C. isolator at the solar panels if the inverter is mounted on the wall that is directly below the solar panels? 2.6.3.2.5 and 2.6.3.2.2 2.6.3.2.5 and 2.6.3.2.3.3 4.4.1.5 Clause 4.4.1.5 in AS/NZS 5033 First paragraph states an isolator shall be adjacent to the array (within 3m and visible from each location). Second paragraph states if the inverter is not in line of sight or more than 3m from the array, then another isolator is required at the inverter. 21