EdCal EdCal v48.28 4/30/18 - Page 4

4 EDCAL April 30 , 2018

Calls for rejecting proposal to end federal funding for afterschool , summer learning programs

More than 200 afterschool providers , community leaders , educators , parents and youth from every state visited Capitol Hill to educate Congress about the urgent need to preserve funding for the quality afterschool and summer learning programs that keep children safe , inspire them to learn and give working parents peace of mind .
The 17th annual Afterschool for All Challenge , sponsored by the Afterschool Alliance , is taking place at a time when the Trump administration is proposing to eliminate all funds for 21st Century Community Learning Centers , the primary federal funding stream for afterschool and summer learning programs .
Advocates are also participating in the Afterschool for All Challenge from home , calling their senators and representatives to discuss the harm that ending funding for afterschool programs would cause .
At a kick-off event , U . S . Senator Lisa Murkowski ( R-AK ) congratulated the afterschool supporters for their advocacy , noting that programs “ take the stress and panic ” out of the afternoon hours for millions of parents , who might otherwise be worried about their kids . She noted these programs can offer relief to many families struggle with addiction and many grandparents are raising their grandchildren . Murkowski also talked about “ the love and care that comes when you know your children are in a safe setting ” like an afterschool program .
“ I ’ m proud of the work I ’ ve done on behalf of afterschool programs with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle ,” said Rep . Lou Barletta ( R-PA ), who co-chairs the House Afterschool Caucus . “ I look forward to continuing to advocate for programs like SHINE ,” a highly successful afterschool program based in Pennsylvania ’ s Carbon , Luzerne and Schuylkill counties .
Rep . David Cicilline ( D-RI ), who serves on the Afterschool Alliance ’ s board of directors , told the gathering that “ our greatest responsibility for our children is to create high-quality , engaging afterschool programs … I am proud to say there ’ s a lot of bipartisanship in support of afterschool .”
“ I understand how important these programs are for not only our families ,” Rep . Andy Harris ( R-MD ) assured the crowd . “ They [ also ] are vital to our communities and to the workforce of the 21st Century .”
Rep . Bobby Scott ( D-VA ) added , “ 3-6 p . m . is a time frame when young people can get into mischief … Young people have better options because of your work .”
The kick-off event was a showcase that also featured remarks by afterschool program students from Camdenton , Miss .; Stratford , Okla .; Toppenish and Walla Walla , Wash .; and Green Bay , Wis ., discussing what their afterschool programs mean to them . The students created videos , photo projects and a virtual reality tour focused on how their afterschool programs support students .
“ From STEM ( science , technology , education and math ) to fitness to community service to health and the arts , and much more , quality afterschool and summer learning programs provide safe places for students to explore their interests and learn ,” said Afterschool Alliance Executive Director Jodi Grant . “ With federal funding for these essential programs at risk , it is more important than ever for Congress to hear directly from educators , program providers , parents and young people themselves about the devastating impact eliminating this funding would have on families and communities . We need to increase public and private funding , so all students can take advantage of the opportunities afterschool and summer learning programs provide .”
Participation in afterschool programs has increased to 10.2 million students nationwide , up from 6.5 million in 2004 , according to the America After 3 p . m . household survey of 30,000 U . S . families , commissioned by the Afterschool Alliance . Today , for every child in an afterschool program , there are two more whose parents say they would participate , if a program were available . One in five students in the country today is unsupervised after the school day ends .

CTC

Continued from page 2
3 . Passing a Commission-approved teaching performance assessment on the first attempt ( for multiple and single subject candidates ).
4 . Passing the RICA ( for multiple subject candidates ).
5 . Meeting the professional fitness background requirements , and
6 . Completion of Task 1 of an approved Teacher Performance Assessment ( TPA ). None of the updated required TPA models measure pedagogical knowledge as a discrete component in the first task . Since pedagogical knowledge is measured within the APK , the CTC was considering several options that would eliminate the completion of the first task of a CTC-approved TPA from the ECO entry requirements as follows :
Option 1 : Remove the TPA from the ECO entry requirements but require the candidate to pass the TPA within their first six months of teaching .
Option 2 : Remove the TPA from the ECO entry requirements and require the
candidate to pass TPA by the end of the school year .
Option 3 : Give the candidate four months to complete the first task of the revised CalTPA and require passage of the full TPA by the end of their first year of teaching .
This agenda item was placed on hold pending staff response to the following CTC questions and concerns from commissioners and stakeholders :
• Has the time arrived to eliminate this option ; is it essential ?
• Would a year be a more practical timeline to pass the TPA rather than six months ?
• Does test passage truly measure understanding of the teaching standards ?
• How long do ECO candidates remain in the profession ?
• How will the candidates be supported ? Would they be included in the Induction program ?
Multi-Tiered System of Support
The Multi-Tiered System of Support ( MTSS ) was created through a collaborative partnership between the California
Department of Education , Orange County Department of Education , Butte County Department of Education , and Swift Education Center of Lawrence , Kansas .
What is a Multi-Tiered System of Support ?
• General ed program .
MTSS is an integrated , comprehensive framework for local educational agencies that aligns academic , behavioral , and social-emotional learning in a fully integrated system of support for the benefit of all students . MTSS affords a full range of academic , behavioral , and social support for all students to achieve by way of a systematic integration of services and supports to quickly identify and meet the needs of all students .
What are the Multi-Tiers ?
• Universal Support-All Students .
Evidence-based priorities and practices that support the academic , behavioral and social-emotional success of all students in the most inclusive and equitable learning environment .
• Supplemental Support for Some
Students .
Additional services provided for some students who require more academic behavioral and social-emotional support .
• Intensified Support .
Targeted academic , behavioral , and social-emotional support directed toward the few students with greater needs .
What strategies are embedded within the tiers ?
• Comprehensive assessment .
• Utilization of teams .
• Provide universal academic support .
• Provide supplemental intervention and support .
• Provide comprehensive behavior support .
• Provide comprehensive social-emotional support .
MTSS was created to address the academic and behavioral needs of all students in order to support the whole child . This program of support is aligned with the LCAP ( Conditions of Inclusive Learning Environment ; Engagement ; Pupil Outcomes ).
Clear your calendars now to attend one of the summer residential programs for school leaders , held at UCLA each summer . Participants have said their experience was life-changing , and have said it helped them achieve a clear vision of their leadership path and how to get others to follow in their journey . These events sell out each summer so be sure to sign up early .
Principals ’ Summer Institute June 24 – 30 , 2018
Institute for New and Aspiring Principals June 25 – 29 , 2018
acsa . org / summerprograms

Free webinar offered – Coordinating LCAP , SPSA and ACS WASC : Lessons from the field

ACSA , in cooperation with the California Department of Education and the Accrediting Commission for Schools Western Association of Schools and Colleges , is sponsoring a free webinar entitled “ Coordinating LCAP , SPSA and ACS WASC : Lessons from the Field ” on Sept . 25 at 10:00 AM . The purpose of the webinar is to provide California public school administrators with examples from the field on how to integrate the LCFF , SPSA , and WASC requirements to support an effective and efficient school improvement process .
This webinar is offered in response to concerns heard from the field about the duplication of efforts to create three different distinct reports : LCAP , SPSA , and ACS WASC . This webinar will provide options to schools on how that they can integrate all three documents into one process . Both CDE and WASC believe that these efforts should be ongoing and supporting of one another .
The webinar will be comprised of two panels . One panel will be experts from each of the three organizations : Marilyn George , ACS WASC vice president ; Thomas Adams , deputy superintendent , CDE ; and Wes Smith , ACSA executive director . The other panel will be comprised of representatives from a sampling of schools that have successfully coordinated the three documents .
Every public school district in California is required to develop , adopt and annually update their LCAP plan and post on their website . The LCAP is a three-year plan that describes the goals , actions , services , and expenditures to support positive student outcomes that address state and local priorities . The LCAP provides an opportunity for local educational agencies to share their stories of how , what , and why programs and services are selected to meet their local needs .
SPSA serves as the organizer for the school ’ s improvement process . The plan is developed with a deep understanding of root causes of student academic challenges and identifies and implements research-based instructional strategies to raise the achievement of students who are not yet proficient by state standards .
ACS WASC accreditation ’ s Focus on Learning process empowers schools to be engaged in a rigorous and relevant self-evaluation and peer review that focuses on student learning and culminates in developing an integrated improvement process through a plan of action .
Public high schools in California are required to be accredited by the University of California and the California State University System if they want their A-G courses approved by the UC and CSU systems for admission . Therefore , all California schools serving grades 9 through 12 are accredited ; however , there are an increasing number of middle and elementary schools that also see the value of the Focus on Learning process and aligning their self-analysis with their feeder high schools .
The Sept . 25 webinar is a follow-up to the session last fall on the same topic , but this year we will be providing examples and testimony from the field from folks that are making this happen . Last September , ACSA , WASC and CDE co-hosted a webinar , “ Working toward Coherence : Aligning ACS WASC , SPSA , and LCAP .” That webinar shared promising practices to increase understanding of how the ACS WASC accreditation process supports school and district alignment of the SPSA and LCAP plans and evaluation of implementation progress .
A webinar video is published and available at www . acsa . org / grwebinars .
4 EDCAL April 30, 2018 Calls for rejecting proposal to end federal funding for afterschool, summer learning programs More than 200 afterschool providers, community leaders, educators, parents and youth from every state visited Capitol Hill to educate Congress about the urgent need to preserve funding for the quality after- school and summer learning programs that keep children safe, inspire them to learn and give working parents peace of mind. The 17th annual Afterschool for All Challenge, sponsored by the Afterschool Alliance, is taking place at a time when the Trump administration is proposing to elim- inate all funds for 21st Century Commu- nity Learning Centers, the primary federal funding stream for afterschool and summer learning programs. Advocates are also participating in the Afterschool for All Challenge from home, calling their senators and representatives to discuss the harm that ending funding for afterschool programs would cause. At a kick-off event, U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) congratulated the af- terschool supporters for their advocacy, not- ing that programs “take the stress and pan- ic” out of the afternoon hours for millions of parents, who might otherwise be worried about their kids. She noted these programs can offer relief to many families struggle with addiction and many grandparents are raising their grandchildren. Murkowski also talked about “the love and care that comes when you know your children are in a safe setting” like an afterschool program. “I’m proud of the work I’ve done on be- half of afterschool programs with my col- leagues on both sides of the aisle,” said Rep. Lou Barletta (R-PA), who co-chairs the House Afterschool Caucus. “I look forward to continuing to advocate for programs like SHINE,” a highly successful afterschool program based in Pennsylvania’s Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties. Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI), who serves on the Afterschool Alliance’s board of directors, told the gathering that “our greatest responsibility for our children is to create high-quality, engaging afterschool programs… I am proud to say there’s a lot of bipartisanship in support of afterschool.” “I understand how important these pro- grams are for not only our families,” Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) assured the crowd. “They [also] are vital to our communities and to the workforce of the 21st Century.” Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA) added, “3-6 p.m. is a time frame when young people can get into mischief… Young people have better options because of your work.” The kick-off event was a showcase that also featured remarks by afterschool program students from Camdenton, Miss.; Stratford, Okla.; Toppenish and Walla Walla, Wash.; and Green Bay, Wis., discussing what their afterschool programs mean to them. The students created videos, photo projects and a virtual reality tour focused on how their afterschool programs support students. “From STEM (science, technology, education and math) to fitness to com- munity service to health and the arts, and much more, quality afterschool and summer learning programs provide safe places for students to explore their inter- ests and learn,” said Afterschool Alliance Executive Director Jodi Grant. “With federal funding for these essential programs at risk, it is more important than ever for Congress to hear directly from educators, program providers, parents and young people themselves about the devastating impact eliminating this funding would have on families and communities. We need to increase public and private funding, so all students can take advantage of the oppor- tunities afterschool and summer learning programs provide.” Participation in afterschool programs has increased to 10.2 million students nationwide, up from 6.5 million in 2004, according to the America After 3 p.m. household survey of 30,000 U.S. families, commissioned by the Afterschool Alliance. Today, for every child in an afterschool program, there are two more whose parents say they would participate, if a program were available. One in five students in the country today is unsupervised after the school day ends. CTC candidate to pass TPA by the end of the school year. Option 3: Give the candidate four months to complete the first task of the revised CalTPA and require passage of the full TPA by the end of their first year of teaching. This agenda item was placed on hold pending staff response to the following CTC questions and concerns from com- missioners and stakeholders: •  Has the time arrived to eliminate this option; is it essential? •  Would a year be a more practical timeline to pass the TPA rather than six months? •  Does test passage truly measure un- derstanding of the teachi r7FF&G3( .("rrFT46FFFW2&VখFR&fW76( .("rvFR6FFFW2&R7W'BЦVCvVBFW&R6VFVBFRGV2ЧF&w&FW'FVBbVGV6F&vR6VGFW'FVBbVGV6F'WGFR6VGFW'FVBbVGV6FB7vgBVGRЦ6F6VFW"bw&V6R627GVFVG2FFF6W'f6W2&fFVBf"6P7GVFVG2v&WV&R&R6FV֖2&RЦf&B66VF7W'B( .("FV6fVB7W'BF&vWFVB6FV֖2&Vf&B6Ц6VF7W'BF&V7FVBFv&BFPfWr7GVFVG2vFw&VFW"VVG26FVVBg&vR 276r6֗76&fV@FV6rW&f&6R76W76VBFPf'7BGFVBf"VFRB6vR7V"ЦV7B6FFFW2B76rFR$4f"VFR7V"ЦV7B6FFFW2RVWFrFR&fW76fFW72&6Цw&VB&WV&VVG2@b6WFbF6b&fV@FV6W"W&f&6R76W76VBERbFRWFFVB&WV&VBEFV2V7W&RVFvv6vVFvR0F67&WFR6VBFRf'7BF666PVFvv6vVFvR2V7W&VBvFFRFR5D2v266FW&r6WfW&F2FBvVBVƖ֖FRFR6RЧFbFRf'7BF6b5D2&fV@Eg&FRT4VG'&WV&VVG20fw3F&VfRFREg&FPT4VG'&WV&VVG2'WB&WV&RFP6FFFRF72FREvFFV"f'7@6F2bFV6rF#&VfRFREg&FPT4VG'&WV&VVG2B&WV&RFPVFFW&VB77FVb7W'@FRVFFW&VB77FVb7W'@E52v27&VFVBF&Vv6&Ч&FfR'FW'6&WGvVVFR6Ɩf&vB2VFFW&VB77FV`7W'C( .("vVW&VB&w&E522FVw&FVB6&VV6fPg&Wv&f"6VGV6FvVЦ6W2FBƖv26FV֖2&Vf&@66VFV&rgVǒFRЦw&FVB77FVb7W'Bf"FR&VVfB`7GVFVG2E52ff&G2gV&vR`6FV֖2&Vf&B667W'Bf 7GVFVG2F6WfR'vb77FVЦF2FVw&Fb6W'f6W2B7W'G2FV6ǒFVFgBVWBFRVVG2b7GVFVG2vB&RFRVFFW'3( .("VfW'67W'B7GVFVG2WfFV6R&6VB&&FW2B&7F6W0FB7W'BFR6FV֖2&Vf&@66VF7V66W72b7GVFVG2FR7B6W6fRBWVF&RV&pVf&VB( .("7WVVF7W'Bf"6PvB7G&FVvW2&RV&VFFVBvFFRFW'3( .("6&VV6fR76W76VB( .("WFƗFbFV2( .("&fFRVfW'66FV֖27W'B( .("&fFR7WVVFFW'fVFB7W'B( .("&fFR6&VV6fR&Vf 7W'B( .("&fFR6&VV6fR66VЧF7W'BE52v27&VFVBFFG&W72FR6ЦFV֖2B&Vf&VVG2b7GVFVG0&FW"F7W'BFRvR6BF0&w&b7W'B2ƖvVBvFFP46FF2b6W6fRV&pVf&VCVvvVVCWWBЦ6W2g&VRvV&"ffW&VB( 26&FFr454B52t43W762g&FRfV@546W&FvFFR6Ɩf&FW'FVBbVGV6F@FR67&VFFr6֗76f"662vW7FW&766Fb660B6VvW2276&rg&VRvV&"VFFVB( 6&FFr454B52t43W762g&FRfVN( 6WB#RBFRW'6RbFRvV&"2F&fFR6Ɩf&V&Ɩ266F֖7G&F'2vFWW2g&FRfVBrFFVw&FRFP4db54Bt42&WV&VVG2F7W'BVffV7FfRBVff6V@66&fVVB&6W726V"W"6VF'2rFGFVBPbFR7VW"&W6FVF&w&2f 66VFW'2VBBT4V67VW"'F6G2fR6BFV"WW&V6Rv0ƖfR6vrBfR6BBVVBFVЦ6WfR6V"f6bFV"VFW'6FBrFvWBFW'2FfrFV W&WFW6RWfVG26VWBV67VW 6&R7W&RF6vWV&ǒ&6>( 7VW"7FGWFPVR#B( 23#7FGWFRf"Wr@7&r&60VR#R( 2##76&r7VW'&w&0F2vV&"2ffW&VB&W76RF66W&2V&Bg&FRfV@&WBFRGWƖ6FbVff'G2F7&VFRF&VRFffW&VBF7F7B&W'G3454B52t42F2vV&"v&fFRF2F662rFBFW6FVw&FRF&VRF7VVG2FR&Ц6W72&F4DRBt42&VƖWfRFBFW6RVff'G26VB&RvpB7W'FrbRFW"FRvV&"v&R6&6VBbGvV2RVv&RWW'G0g&V6bFRF&VR&v旦F3&ǖvV&vR52t42f6P&W6FVCF2F2FWWG7WW&FVFVB4DSBvW26֗F54WV7WFfRF&V7F"FRFW"Vv&R6&6VBb&W&W6VЧFFfW2g&6Ɩrb662FBfR7V66W76gVǒ6&FFV@FRF&VRF7VVG2WfW'V&Ɩ266F7G&7B6Ɩf&2&WV&VBFFWfVFB@VǒWFFRFV"4B7BFV"vV'6FRFR40F&VRזV"FBFW67&&W2FRv27F26W'f6W2BWVЦFGW&W2F7W'B6FfR7GVFVBWF6W2FBFG&W727FFRB6&&FW2FR4&fFW2'GVGf"6VGV6FvVЦ6W2F6&RFV"7F&W2brvBBv&w&2B6W'f6W0&R6VV7FVBFVWBFV"6VVG2546W'fW22FR&v旦W"f"FR66( 2&fVVB&6W72FP2FWfVVBvFFVWVFW'7FFrb&B6W6W2b7GVFV@6FV֖26VvW2BFVFfW2BVVG2&W6V&6&6V@7G'V7F7G&FVvW2F&6RFR6WfVVBb7GVFVG2v&R@WB&f6VB'7FFR7FF&G252t4267&VFFF( 2f7W2V&r&6W72VvW'2660F&RVvvVB&v&W2B&VWfB6VbWfVFBVW"&WfWpFBf7W6W27GVFVBV&rB7V֖FW2FWfVrFRЦw&FVB&fVVB&6W72F&Vvb7FV&Ɩ2v6626Ɩf&&R&WV&VBF&R67&VFFVB'FPVfW'6Gb6Ɩf&BFR6Ɩf&7FFRVfW'6G77FV`FWvBFV"r6W'6W2&fVB'FRT2B55R77FV2f F֗76FW&Vf&R 6Ɩf&6626W'frw&FW2F&Vv &R67&VFFVCvWfW"FW&R&R7&V6rV&W"b֖FFR@VVVF'662FB66VRFRfVRbFRf7W2V&p&6W72BƖvrFV"6VbǗ62vFFV"fVVFW"v662FR6WB#RvV&"2frWFFR6W767BfFR6PF2'WBF2V"vRv&R&fFrWW2BFW7Fg&ЧFRfVBg&fƷ2FB&RrF2V7B6WFV&W"54t42B4DR6ֆ7FVBvV&"( v&rFv&B6W&V6SƖvr52t4254B4( FBvV&"6&VB&֗6p&7F6W2F7&V6RVFW'7FFrbrFR52t4267&VFFF&6W727W'G266BF7G&7BƖvVBbFR54B42BWfVFbVVFF&w&W72vV&"fFV2V&Ɨ6VBBf&RBwwr76&rw'vV&'2