BioVoice News June 2016 Issue 2 Volume 1 - Page 26

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2015 to identify key challenges in terms of lack of adequate healthcare protection to the population , and find solutions to address these gaps . The recommendations made by the experts at these roundtables were summarized in two Consultation

Papers ‘ Addressing NCDs in India Through Innovation and Multi- Sectoral Response ’ and ‘ Innovative Models of Healthcare Financing for a Healthier India ’ and presented to several key policy makers and others during the subsequent one-onone meetings .
A significant part of PFCD ’ s work in India has been on policy recommendations to the Draft National Health Policy . Encouraged by the responses from the stakeholders to move towards an evidence-based action plan , PFCD started work on a National Blueprint in early 2015 . SANKALP – DishaSwastha Bharat Ki was released in October 2015 at New Delhi . This evidence-based document was an attempt to facilitate the government , healthcare implementers - both at the public as well as private establishments - to adopt innovative programs for prevention and control of NCDs in India and advance the momentum for reforms at the state level . In the coming months , we are looking to build momentum for
health reform efforts at the state level and build capacity through sharing of best practices , and alliance building with organizations , both public as well as private . We plan to sharpen the focus on states in India which are heavily burdened by NCDs . Further ,

India spends a little over one per cent of its GDP , a meager figure which has led the majority of Indians to pay almost 60- 70 per cent of healthcare expenses out-of-pocket . India ’ s public spending on health is one of the lowest in the world .

we plan to undertake a comparative impact assessment of NCDs on the socio-economic well-being of a community , before and after an inclusive and sustained programme implementation to control the growth of NCDs .
Should the government increase its health spending or the big corporate should chip in their support for health initiatives ? Increasing investments in healthcare is the need of the hour for India to overcome its high disease burden . Global evidence suggests that unless a country spends at least six per cent of its GDP on healthcare , basic healthcare needs are seldom met . India spends a little over one per cent of its GDP , a meager figure which has led the majority of Indians to pay almost 60-70 per cent of healthcare expenses out-of-pocket . India ’ s public spending on health is one of the lowest in the world .
There are close to 12 million people in India ’ s workforce . The probability of death during the most productive years ( ages 30-70 ) from one of the four main NCDs is a staggering 26 per cent , hampering not only health but also the productivity and work output . A disproportionate people in India are suffering from poor health and frequent illness , leading to absenteeism at workplace , lack of attention and lower productivity . All these factors are inversely proportional to the country ’ s growth .
The corporates can contribute towards building healthy workplaces . They can introduce annual medical check-up camps for employees , construct adequate pathway within the campus to encourage walking , providing healthy eating options and refrain from providing aerated beverages and junk food during official meetings . These efforts will not only help the employees , but also the companies in enhancing productivity and reducing time spent on medical leave .
Public funding and adequate allocation of resources in the healthcare system are vital in providing affordable access to healthcare services and facilities . Models of public and private healthcare financing can work in collaboration to cater to the unique needs of the diverse population in India . PPP will help the government ensure greater healthcare coverage . Through a mix of public and private initiatives , the government can promote an efficient use of resources for training , medical education , diagnostic equipment and preventive care delivery requirements .
India needs to work on increasing investment in healthcare at the federal as well as state levels . The National Blueprint , SANKALP has already outlined the need for India to increase the current expenditure on healthcare from 1.1 per cent of the GDP to at least 2.5-3 per cent , with an increased focus on preventing and treating NCDs .
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BioVoiceNews | June 2016