Beacon Tabs OSU Extension 100 Years - Page 4

4-H makes a lifetime impact By Josie Sellers josie@coshoctoncountybeacon.com Contributed Contributed that’s my dad’s,” Donaker said. “I also have his junior leaders’ jacket, there are show ribbons, newsletters from the club congress and judging cards from dairy cattle.” While these pieces of history may show how time has changed, some traditions have stood the test of time with the Hamilton Valley Hustlers. “It’s our tradition to pick up litter as our community service,” Donaker said. “We do that on the county and township roads and we still have our annual wiener roast every fall.” Club members are encouraged to take whatever proj- ects interest them and Donaker said the advisors do their best to assist them. “We may not be experts in everything, but we will cer- tainly help,” she said. Contributed Donaker truly believes 4-H gave her the confi dence to try new things. “I was in the Navy for 12 years as an electronics techni- cian,” she said. “I believe 4-H gave me the confi dence to do that and apply for my role at Th e Ohio State University. I’ve been there for 21 years working in the technology fi eld. I truly believe that the opportunities I had with 4-H helped me make life decisions and achieve career goals.” Donaker believes in the impact of 4-H so much that she makes a monetary donation every year to help off set camp counselor fees. “I want other people who love 4-H as much as I do to know that there are ways they can help,” she said. “A small monetary donation can help a lot of kids in a lot of ways.” Thanks for 100 Years of Serving Our Community! Congratulations on your 100 year anniversary! wtns radio 1560 Follow us on Auer visit www.acehardware.com and follow the links www.mywtnsradio.com 4-B THE BEACON Contributed 0003_040319 COSHOCTON – 4-H runs deep in Jamie Donaker’s family. “Both of my parents were in 4-H, one grandparent was a member and others were advisors in the 1930s,” she said. “It was a choice to join, but it was still part of our culture. If you were a young child with older siblings in 4-H, you couldn’t wait to be part of the great things they were doing.” Donaker is still with the Hamilton Valley Hustlers 4-H Club as an advisor. “It was started in the 1950s,” she said. “My parents assumed it in the 1970s.” During her 4-H years, Donaker did cooking, sewing, dairy, and market lamb projects. She also had a horse. “Th ere wasn’t much else to do back then,” she said. “We had no internet and no TV. We were very much a farm family and I’m grateful for the skills I learned from 4-H. Going to 4-H camp as a camper and counselor is defi - nitely at the top of my list of memories and the Coshocton County Fair was kind of the cherry on top for the end of the 4-H year.” Donaker has seen a lot of changes with 4-H programs over the years, but says the fundamentals of the organi- zation have stayed the same. “Th e ethics and values 4-H teaches and promotes are part of its basic foundation and are still followed today,” she said. “Th e 4-H motto, ‘To make the best better’ is about reaching within yourself from year to year and try- ing to do a little better. Th at carries into adult life as well. Th ere is a big community service aspect to 4-H as well. We want them (members) to know that there is more to life than just them. Th ere is a whole community out there that needs help and can help you if you need it.” With fi ve generations of the family now impacted by 4-H, Donaker has collected a lot of memorabilia, espe- cially now that her dad lives with her. “I have projects books from the 1940s and 1950s that were my dad’s and advisor handbooks that had belonged to his mother,” she said. While looking through her dad’s items, she discovered he once had a technology-based club. “It was called the Push Button Farmers and some of their projects dealt with electricity,” Donaker said. “I had no idea about it, but I might have got my knack for tech- nology from him.” She also learned that her grandmother went to the 1931 4-H Club Congress and her dad went in 1954. “I have pamphlets from it and a four foot long picture 1961 Otsego Ave., Coshocton • 740-622-4056 0004_040319 Email: auerace@clover.net • www.acehardware.com www.coshoctonbeacontoday.com APRIL 17, 2019