Asia-Pacific Broadcasting (APB) August 2017 Volume 34, Issue 6 - Page 25

DISTRIBUTION August 2017 25 to provide key connectivity audiences in providing the next generation of services that can be delivered by satellite, and the equipment used needs to be flexible and effi­ cient, emphasises Thomas Van den Driessche, CEO of Newtec, a ground segment technology provider. Connectivity is crucial to tele­ ports, he continues. “To deliver the services that satellite technology can provide, teleports need to be connected to high-speed fibre, with gigabit connectivity to the Internet and other services, in or­ der to fulfil its role in the network infrastructure. “Alongside this, the teleport needs to work hand-in-hand with data-centre infrastructure and the cloud, and to embrace this archi­ tecture to provide cloud-based services to their customers.” The need to operate and host modern applications in a cost- effective way is also driving the industry towards high through­ put satellites (HTS) and spot beam ope­ration, Driessche notes. Because HTS require multiple tele­ports to handle the increased capacity, operators need to be able to cooperate with or act as an infrastructure provider to HTS satellite operators, he advises. “A modern teleport will need to accommodate for changes by providing ultimate flexibility and scalability through platforms such as Newtec Dialog, which can be ‘plugged into’ to avoid unnecessary duplication of equipment.” The satellite industry is contin­ ually in a process of re-invention through HTS, small satellites and an array of new applications, con­ curs STN’s Lovsin. “We are living in an era where technology is advancing rapidly — almost on a daily basis, and the satellite, teleport and broadcast­ ing industries are no exception,” he says. “One thing is for sure, technology will continue to move at this blistering speed.” Lovsin urges all teleport operators to be prepared for a future where Ka band eventually becomes satu­ rated, taking the industry instead to new frequency bands such as Q and V bands. And STN is convinced of the ❝ To deliver the services that satellite technology can provide, teleports need to be connected to high-speed fibre, with gigabit connectivity to the Internet and other services, in order to fulfil its role in the network infrastructure. ❞ — Thomas Van den Driessche, CEO, Newtec role teleport will continue to play as the industry evolves, as Lovsin describes: “While the traditional broadcast market may be satu­ rated, the Internet of Things (IoT) is still in its infancy. Couple this with an insatiable demand for bandwidth in mobility and other areas, and you be assured that the teleport is far from extinction.” Telstra, meanwhile, believes that the “widespread” move to IP and the adoption of virtualisation and the cloud, coupled with evolv­ ing viewer demands, is rapidly changing the broadcast and media industry. “To address this, our strategy involves creating signature cus­ tomer experiences, rather than just products,” explains Telstra’s Boal. “This includes our investments in Telstra Broadcast Services, which brings together a dedicated team of media industry professionals, high performance media net­ works, online video and cloud platforms, among other offerings, to give our customers a seamless broadcast experience.” And as broadcast content evolves to a stage where content providers and owners can deliver more content than ever before, Te